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Hello all, I've been lurking here for awhile learning alot as well as getting some ideas. Thanks for that. My question concerns a rather large sycamore tree I'm fixing to fell on my father's lot. Is sycamore of much interest as far as woodworking goes. From my searching the main value I've come across is for butcher blocks. Any other comments on this wood.
Thanks.
 

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Welcome. If it is big it is perfect for 1/4 sawing. Quarter sawn sycamore is very desirable to woodworkers. I don't know how much you know about your local sawmills, or sawmilling at all. I bet I could find you a good mill pretty close ?
Here is a little picture of 1/4 sawn (flat sawn it is about the plainest wood out there) milled right it is really cool :thumbsup:.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The tree is a least 2' in diameter, so it's relatively large. Maybe total height 40-50'. Any recommendations as far as lengths to cut.
BTW, I'm in Nashville, TN. I know of a few smaller mills around here, but
have no idea as what the cost to have it quartersawn would be.
 

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Lengths are not as important as straight sections for 1/4 saw. I would rather have a 6' log that is arrow straight than a 12' with a bend in it. You are not looking for framing material, so the standard 8'6", 10'6",12'6"...that most mills like does not matter. Cut it in 6' minimum lengths (8' is better if doable). You are talking woodworking/furniture stock here, it is going to be cut by the user, you? into shorter pieces anyway.

Seal the ends after you cut it with latex paint at the very least, I prefer Anchorseal, but for a guy getting a log every once in awhile it is pricey. You should endseal it to keep it from busting on the ends as they dry.

As far as cost. In your area I can not imagine more than $.45 bft to 1/4 saw...if sawn right it should be worth $3.00+ bft kiln dried (the wide ones may be $5.00) Kiln drying in your area is about $.25 bft.

Do a search for "American lacewood", it's 1/4 sawn sycamore. It is best sawn 5/4 for furniture, give some room for planing. Sawn 5/4 it can also be resawn thin too for jewelry boxes etc., it is a decorative wood. Too often overlooked.

Good luck. Any more questions, you know where to ask :smile:
 

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Slat, and as Daren also knows, add a little spalting and you have some $12+ BF wood. I have some "cooking" as we speak.

Before you ask I will tel you not to ask how to spalt it. Just have it sawn up as Daren suggested and have it dried. It will be worth the trouble as it is one of NAs most beautiful woods IMO.
 

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Just don't plan on staining it. It blotches much worse than any other wood. I had to use tinted shellac.
The natural wood is rather pretty; it just wasn't the color I needed.

Other than that it is nice; comparable to soft maple maybe.
 
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