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sawdust manufacturer
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581 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Howdy All!

Been away fer awhile, but have been in the shop...:shifty:

Question regarding the pictured piece of staghorn sumac...

I'd like to turn this into a lamp base, but am obviously concerned about the mild checking.:laughing:

I'm wondering if this could be saved by casting?
Or should I just accept the fact that this is a pant-load of stopper/pen blanks in log form?

I can, and probably will, fill the smaller checks with CA.

I'd like to put some color in the big gap...

Any suggestions or advice?

If this could be saved/casted, would I need a big pressure pot, or better yet, send this to one of the exemplary casters present?:yes:

Thanks everybody!

p


 

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Yea i got wood
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3,016 Posts
ive seen alot of the guys here use something like an epoxy with colored
stuff in it
look at cureodoc posts he uses it alot on his turnings
 

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Senior Member
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7,222 Posts
That is a BIG gap. Very expensive to fill with epoxy.

A commerical product is called In-Lace. Not cheap. Nice appearance.

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Mer...=packard&Category_Code=proj-supp-inlay-inlace

Folks like cuerodoc grind up material and mix with epoxy. Even making your own material will be expensive.

Have you considered ripping some contrasting wood in 1/8in thick or thinner strips to glue into the gap with epoxy. Save on the cost of epoxy and could add the colour contrast you are looking for.
 

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3,257 Posts
Epoxy is cheaper than Inlace. However that is a big crack and will cost you a fair amount in epoxy to fix it. Dam up both ends with something that will stop the epoxy. I would color the epoxy before filling the gap. I use all sorts of things from paint to powdered chalk and/or shoe dye. If you have any more of that wood you could cut out a wedge to partially fill the crack. Then put your epoxy in and then put the wedge in. This will take less epoxy.
Personally I would cut it through the crack and turn whats left into box or spindle blanks. That's what I usually do to cracked wood now. I don't waste my time and money trying to save it as a big chunk anymore.
 

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sawdust manufacturer
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581 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies, guys!:thumbsup:

I DO have baggies full of shavings and such that I could use as a filler, with epoxy...

Maybe a bunch of ERC..?

I like the idea of cutting a wood filler wedge, though the crack is not straight, and I'd end up spending a fair amount of time shaping to fit decently...:blink:

I've used inlace many times, and think that I be hard-pressed to convince myself to try it in that space.:no:

Again, I appreciate ya'll!

p
 

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Senior Sawdust Sweeper
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1,529 Posts
I would slice the log along the cracks, plane the surfaces flat, remove the inner inch of the pith and glue it all back up after cutting the proper angle into it to fit a 360 degree glueup. Even as a segmented piece it should look pretty good. The resulting gap in the middle should make the lamp easier to wire up.
 
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