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As an Electrician by trade, A 100 amp panel should be plenty. You can get one with 20 or 30 slots. If your shop is 1,000 square feet or more I would recommend a panel with 30 slots, otherwise 20 would be fine. The size of your subpanel would also depend on the size of your main panel. You can't really have a subpanel the same size or bigger than the main panel that is feeding it.
 

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Nope, no problem at all. A lot of electrical equipment will have different voltages listed on them, such as one item would say 110 volts and another item would say 120 volts. They really are rated the same. The same goes for 230 and 240.
 

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The gauge of the wire on the power cord of the tool it self doesn't really matter since the tool isn't going to draw more than the 13 amps it is rated at for 110 volts anyways. The rating of the plug and receptacle are just what they can withstand, it doesn't mean that is how much amperage is there. A 15 amp 240 volt plug would also work but if you already have a 20 amp plug, it is fine.
 

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The size of the cord absolutely does matter. The sizing guides exist for a reason. What if some day that cord is removed, and someone reuses it? Just because it will work doesn't mean it should be done. Buy a 15 amp plug( which will work in a 20 amp outlet, and be done with it.
I guess I don't understand why someone would reuse a power cord off of a tool that is probably only 6 feet long. Now if your making your own power cord so that it is longer, agreed use 12 gauge wire or use a 15 amp plug if said cord is only 14 gauge.
 
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