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So, i recently found an old stanley bailey no 4, i believe it's a type #19(c.1948-1961) for pretty cheap at an antique shop. I was in the process of taking it all apart when i got stuck on the tote screw. The tote itself has a little wobble to it, but no matter how hard i try i can't budge the screw holding it down.

So, i'm wondering if there's any one else who has run into a similar problem, or if you guys have any suggestions on how to remove the screw without damaging the threads, screw head, or the tote itself.
thanks for the help!
 

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A little clarification needed. Post some pictures of your progress.

On the No. 4 the tote is held in place by a single steel screw with a brass barrel nut at the top.

Are you able to remove the brass barrel nut, but not the steel screw, or the brass barrel nut and steel screw will not move?

I am guessing you may mean both barrel nut and screw are stuck.

I have only restored a few No. 3 or 4, but I have observed that the ones I have worked on have all had a lot of wobble in the tote in the as-received condition. Some of this is the original slop in the size of the holes drilled. Easier to fit things together when screw angles differ, etc.

You will need to try and get some rust penetrant into the bottom of the screw where it goes into the hole in the casting.

I have had a few screws where even with penetrant I have not been able to remove the brass nut without applying such force to damage the nut. So likely going to have more success getting the steel screw out of the steel casting.

The best penetrant on the market is Kroil. Not found in local stores. You need to order on-line.

http://www.kanolabs.com/google/

In the meantime, you can try a bit of a hail Mary pass and put the casting and tote in oxalic acid solution. See this thread for details. Cheap to try. My container of oxalic acid aka Wood Bleach cost only $8 and will make many gallons.

In my local True Value hardware store this was in the aisle with the wood stains and finishes.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/first-time-using-oxalic-acid-rust-removal-48107/

If you are lucky the oxalic acid will remove just enough rust to be able to free the screw. It will not harm the tote, although it will get a bit wet so dry out carefully.

Water molecules are fairly large and water has a lot of surface tension, so it is not easy for water based solutions like oxalic to penetrate down into the screw threads.

The Kroil is designed to penetrate and dissolve the rust.

Here is one of my rust bucket restorations of a No. 4.
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/plane-restore-round-3-a-47883/
 

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I can't move the brass barrel nut or the steel screw. i'll have to try the oxalic acid and see how that works...do you think wd40, or a simple rust penetrator like pb blaster would do the trick?
WD-40 is not a good rust penetrant. It is a good product to displace water and remove very superficial rust, but for your needs it is not likely to do anything.

You can try PB Blaster. Some of the older barrel nuts had a hole drilled through the entire nut prior to threading. Not sure if yours is like this. Try to clean out the slot. If rusty in the middle then you have a hole. Use this with the penetrant. Be generous, you want the excess to run down the hole to the bottom of the screw. You want to be either getting the barrel nut off, or the barrel nut and screw just so you can get the tote off to continue with the restoration.

The tote looks to be in good shape, so once you get the screw/nut loose, it will re-finish and look good as new.

I have a flat blade screwdriver with a small hex shaped section close to the handle. I use a wrench on the hex shaped section to provide more leverage. Have to be careful to not damage the brass.

Edit. Even when you get the screw free and cleaned up, I would expect the tote to still have a wobble when restored due to the size of the small hole in the foot. Larger than the little bump in the casting. I do not like this design, but it saved Stanley from the expense of a toe screw.
 
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