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Discussion Starter #1
OK, I seemed to have two stripped jointer gib bolts on my Delta 8" jointer and can't get one of the knives off. I tried using some WD40, but these puppies are rounded and I can't get a grip on them. We tried to cut the heads off with an oscillating multi tool, but all we had was a blade for wood and now it is wrecked. Will a metal blade for this kind of tool cut these bolts?

Any other suggestions? I don't have a dremel, but would it have a blade that can cut these?

Back in jointer hell.

Thanks
Paul



 

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Discussion Starter #3
The Delta parts website said they had the gib bolts in stock and at $1.19 ea., I figured I would just order them from them. They hit you with a $9.95 shipping charge whether it is two bolts or five, so I got some extras. I ordered five, probably should have got more to have on hand. I did order some other things to make the $10 shipping less painful. I got a new spring for the cutter guard and I ordered a small part for my Delta band saw. Now I just need to get the old ones out.
 

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where's my table saw?
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I'm betting they are 10 mm heads

If all else fails you can saw them off using a Dremel and a cut off
wheel. That will permit removing the gibs from the slots.

Remember that they turn CW in to shorten their length, not CCW!
Use a 10mm wrench and see if they will turn ..... :yes:
 
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Discussion Starter #5
They were actually 8mm and that was loose, but 7mm was too tight. I don't own a dremel, but I do have use of one of those oscillating multi tools. I am hoping a blade made to cut metal will do the trick on OMT. A dremel would be cool to have, but I can think of other things I could use before I bought one. We will see.
 

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Jack of too many trades..
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I'd suggest a narrow-tip vice grip, locked to the gib bolt.

If you weld, a good trick is to put a small bead on the bolt - plenty of purchase.

Get a set of small files (flat) and file a new surface on the gib bolt. go after it with a smaller wrench. Use a cheapie disposable wrench (slightly smaller) and hammer it on.

Heat... such as from a small pipe-sweating torch. The metal will expand, and then spritz with water to "shrink" it and break the tension.

Maybe the most straightforward of all. Cut the bolt off with a hack-saw, reciprocating saw, or a metal chisel. If the head stripped, it's probably not grade 8 hardware or tool steel.

Worst case.. pry the dang thing up after driving a wedge under the gib from the side.

There are a lot of options here. You just want to minimize damage (obviously)


Get a new set of Gibs and Bolts from Grizzly if you need new ones. A complete set gibs, blades, and bolts for my 6" Enco cost me well under $50 w/ shipping.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks RepairmanJack. I ordered new bolts, today, from Delta and I hope they get here soon. I was shocked that they showed in stock knowing all the problems folks have been having getting repair parts from Delta. My plan is to buy a metal cutting blade for an oscillating multi tool my brother has and hope it cuts the bolts. Next step would be a Dremel with cutoff wheel, but that would require me buying one and I don't really want to do that now. I tried the needle nose vice grips but they just rounded it more. I have a 4" grinder but I don't think it would fit in the groove and if it did, it might do more damage than it helps.

The worst part is after I get it out, I still have to reset the knives evenly, which was the major problem I had before this one. I am not good at it and hate doing it. I have yet to be able to get them right. Stay tuned.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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If your jointer is anything like my long gone 6", the heads of the bolts are metric and the threads are imperial.

There is a hack saw blade holder at Lowes that would help you. The hack saw blade is held sort of like a pocket knife. I think that I would go that route before trying a multi tool.

As for aligning the blades. . . .

Clamp two aluminum angle to the out feed table, one next to the fence and one at the outside edge. (Think angle iron but made of aluminum. I don't know what to call it.) Install a knife high. Snug the gib screws but not tight. Turn the cutter head backward and as the knives pass the aluminum they will be pushed to the appropriate height. Keep turning the head until you can tighten the gib screws.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Use a tight fitting wrench ... even if

If you have to grind down the thickness of a good quality wrench to fit then do it now for this and for next time. The cheapie wrenches usually supplied to do fit tight enough and allow the heads to strip out.

A sharp tap on the wrench will always break a stuck bolt easier than increasing pressure. You can use the palm of your hand or a small dead blow plastic hammer. :yes:
 

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Old School
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Remember that they turn CW in to shorten their length, not CCW!
Use a 10mm wrench and see if they will turn ..... :yes:
Sounds like you're backwards. I guess that depends on which way you're lookin' at them. The last time I removed a knife, on a Delta, the bolts were normal thread. That is, when unscrewing, the head backs out away from the gib and tightens the gib. When turning the bolt in, the head moves closer to the gib, for gib removal/loosening.






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Paul, I think if you take that head out of the jointer (which should be a 15 minute job) you'll find it's a lot easier to work on. I think if it's on a bench, you might be able to force something on to the bolt heads to get them loose.
 

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where's my table saw?
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Nope

Remember that they turn CW in, to shorten their length, not CCW!
Use a 10mm wrench and see if they will turn ..... :yes:
Sounds like you're backwards. I guess that depends on which way you're lookin' at them. The last time I removed a knife, on a Delta, the bolts were normal thread. That is, when unscrewing, the head backs out away from the gib and tightens the gib. When turning the bolt in, the head moves closer to the gib, for gib removal/loosening.



.

By turning them IN ...CW, you shorten their length allowing them to release the pressure against the cutter head. NOPE, I'm not backwards., you're just repeating what I said.
 

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They were actually 8mm and that was loose, but 7mm was too tight. I don't own a dremel, but I do have use of one of those oscillating multi tools. I am hoping a blade made to cut metal will do the trick on OMT. A dremel would be cool to have, but I can think of other things I could use before I bought one. We will see.
What do you mean by "a dremel?" Dremel makes more than one type of tool. One type IS a multi-tool. Any brand of multi-tool should have a metal cutting blade that will do what you want.

George
 

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where's my table saw?
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the original Dremel

What do you mean by "a dremel?" Dremel makes more than one type of tool. One type IS a multi-tool. Any brand of multi-tool should have a metal cutting blade that will do what you want.

George
The original Dremel is a small diameter, high speed rotary "grinding or polishing" tool.
It's only recently they have come out with the multi-tool.
Dremel have become a generic tool for the small high speed rotary tools made by most manufacturers, just like "skil" saw became the generic name for a hand held circular saw.

I would NOT use a multi-tool for this because the blade is hardened steel and will likely dull, but the rotary tool is an abrasive grinding wheel and will not dull in use, just wear down.
 

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Old School
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By turning them IN ...CW, you shorten their length allowing them to release the pressure against the cutter head. NOPE, I'm not backwards., you're just repeating what I said.
I'm not trying to confuse anything. With a normal thread CW pushes the bolt head towards the cutterhead, making the gib tighter. My thinking with a normal thread, that clockwise will back the bolt out...making it longer. Maybe it's where you are standing, and how you are looking at the bolts.

Lets do it this way. Suppose you are on the side of the jointer where the guard is. If you put a wrench on the bolt head and pull it towards you, CW, the bolt backs out and gets longer and pushes against the gib making it tighter. If you push the wrench away from you (making it shorter), CCW, the bolt enters the gib and loosens the gib.

Your words: Remember that they turn CW in to shorten their length, not CCW!






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where's my table saw?
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CW vs CCW

OK, if I turn a bolt CW it goes in, right? CCW it come out, right.
What to the bolts do in the gib? They bear against the cutter head, right? You want to release the pressure by turning them in CW, to shorten their length. Its the gib that's threaded, not the cutterhead, right?
I just did this on 2 jointers recently, so I think I have it correct, but of course I could be "backwards"..... right? :no:

See the bolt in the center and the near end are pulled off the cutterhead, showing a gap?



This video explains it at 1:08 in:

As far as removing 8:45 in:
 

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Old School
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OK, if I turn a bolt CW it goes in, right? CCW it come out, right.
What to the bolts do in the gib? They bear against the cutter head, right? You want to release the pressure by turning them in CW, to shorten their length. Its the gib that's threaded, not the cutterhead, right?
I just did this on 2 jointers recently, so I think I have it correct, but of course I could be "backwards"..... right?

See the bolt in the center and the near end are pulled off the cutterhead, showing a gap?
You keep editing your posts, and don't state what you change, so I'm not sure where this all started. I sure don't want to re-read your posts and try to figure out what you said the first time.






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Scotty D
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The worst part is after I get it out, I still have to reset the knives evenly, which was the major problem I had before this one. I am not good at it and hate doing it. I have yet to be able to get them right. Stay tuned.
Might be a good time to look into a spiral cutter head. :smile:
 

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I kind of got lost scanning the thread. If you still need to cut them, I'd use a narrow metal cutting disk on a 4-1/2" grinder, and go slowly and carefully.

I have an older model of this in 8". I use a narrow strip of Boxwood to install the blades. It's really quick. I put the sharp blade in place, and only tighten the end screws enough to hold the knife in place, but still be able to move it with fingers. Lay the strip of hard wood across the outfeed table on either end of the knife, and rotate the cutterhead back and forth. If the strip of wood is not too big, you can feel when the knife just barely strikes the wood. If it lifts the strip, use the strip to push it down flush with the outfeed table. When it's right, snug that bolt ever so slightly, so you can still move the knife on the other end. When you have both ends exact, and those bolts tightened, tighten the middle ones, and it's in.

After a few times, you should be able to install a knife in 30 seconds. I have a micrometer for setting knives, as well as the magnetic things. The boxwood strips are much quicker and easier for me. My boxwood strips are maybe 1/4 x 1/2-just some leftovers from replacing boxing in molding planes that I tried once, and have never pulled the other rigs out of the Setup toolbox since.
 
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