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I've recently aquired several BF of white oak, that has been face planed, but not straight lined. I found this link for a simple jig, http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/reviews/4283497

Just wondering if anyone has any advice on a better one, or if anyone has used something similar and had good luck with it. Once I get them straight lined one one side, I can run them through my table saw and get the other side.

Thanks for the help.
 

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Old School
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I've recently aquired several BF of white oak, that has been face planed, but not straight lined. I found this link for a simple jig, http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/reviews/4283497

Just wondering if anyone has any advice on a better one, or if anyone has used something similar and had good luck with it. Once I get them straight lined one one side, I can run them through my table saw and get the other side.

Thanks for the help.
You could take it to the table saw first. To joint on the table saw, a very simple method would be to attach to the subject stock, a straight edge...could be thin plywood or Masonite, so the clean edge rides on the fence, and the edge of the subject stock goes through the blade.

To attach the straightedge, you can just nail it down on the wood's backside, with 4d finish nails...3 or 4 should be plenty.





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+1 with Cabinetman on using some other straight piece as a guide for the table saw.

If you do not want to attach with finish nails, use double sided tape. I have the wood turners double sided tape. This hold very well.

These days I will also attempt to straighten one edge of a rough lumber piece with my #5 jack plane. I can get close enough so this edge is used against the fence. Straighten the other edge then flip to finish the first edge.

Using a hand plane needs the board to be clamped with the edge up. May not be so easy for you.
 

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where's my table saw?
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depending on how many pieces...

I needed to straight line many, actually dozens of pieces, so I made a "jig" rather than scab on strips each time, which is way too time consuming for me.... "snap on" then rip and "snap off'"...next piece... :yes:
I made two sizes,one long enough for 8 footers and a 54" for shorter boards. I used 1/4" hardboard for the bottom and a 1 X 3" piece of Oak for the toggles to mount on. It looks like this:
 

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where's my table saw?
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Rockler has one

It's on sale:

 

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Old School
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If you do not want to attach with finish nails, use double sided tape. I have the wood turners double sided tape. This hold very well.
I've tried the double sided tape, and the only problems were with overly oily wood, or dust on the wood. I use the finish nails as I think it's safer. I nail the template (¼" ply or ¼" tempered Masonite) on the back side of the wood (where the nail holes won't likely show), and it's run against the fence with the template on top. I prefer just the substrate for a straightedge, as it won't warp and it will stay straight, unlike using a piece of lumber. I don't find that it's too time consuming.





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where's my table saw?
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nope, just some toggles

Do I need to do anything special to make this, except make sure that both the masonite and the oak is straight lined?
You can make some wing nut type clamps also. Most of my stock is 1" to 3/4" and rough sawn so a clamp with a range of 1/4" will work fine.

The Masonite or other 1/4" up to 1/2", substrate will have a "factory straight" edge if you rip a 10" wide piece. Then mount your Oak flush to that edge, screw it down and then rip the opposite edge, it should be straight.

You can instantly adjust the board in the jig for maximum material useage. You can also cut tapers by aligning the marks at the blade side of the jig and cutting flush with that edge. ;) bill

 

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Old School
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You can make some wing nut type clamps also. Most of my stock is 1" to 3/4" and rough sawn so a clamp with a range of 1/4" will work fine.

The Masonite or other 1/4" up to 1/2", substrate will have a "factory straight" edge if you rip a 10" wide piece. Then mount your Oak flush to that edge, screw it down and then rip the opposite edge, it should be straight.

You can instantly adjust the board in the jig for maximum material useage. You can also cut tapers by aligning the marks at the blade side of the jig and cutting flush with that edge. ;) bill


As a courtesy.





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where's my table saw?
Joined
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31,476 Posts
You can make some wing nut type clamps also. Most of my stock is 1" to 3/4" and rough sawn so a clamp with a range of 1/4" will work fine.

The Masonite or other 1/4" up to 1/2", substrate will have a "factory straight" edge if you rip a 10" wide piece. Then mount your Oak flush to that edge, screw it down and then rip the opposite edge, it should be straight.

You can instantly adjust the board in the jig for maximum material useage. You can also cut tapers by aligning the marks at the blade side of the jig and cutting flush with that edge. ;) bill


You can use clamps like these rather than toggles:
PVC Tipped Aluminum Hold Downs




These PVC Tipped Hold-Down Clamps feature non-marring PVC tips that are the perfect tool for working with softer woods, finished surfaces or for any stock that needs to kept in place. The PVC also gives you more gripping power when pressure is applied to your stock. This prevents slipping and walking of your wood especially when drilling on a drill press. Our PVC tipped hold downs come with a star knob and bolt and are available in the two most commonly used sizes of 1/4" x 20 and 3/8 x 16. .scription
Price
http://www.ptreeusa.com/holdDown_clamps.htm
 
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