Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to use kiln-dried poplar planks to cover the walls in an office I'm building. The planks I have are 3/4" thick x 7.25" wide x various lengths. They have been surfaced planed by the sawmill.

The problem I have is that some of the boards are slightly bowed such that when you place 2 together (3/4" sides butt-jointed) there is sometimes a significant gap that I can not live with for a finished wall.

A local mill will straigh-edge the boards for ~.16/LF - but I have about 2500 LF to do. Would a rabbet joiner work well to straighten the boards that require truing up? I have tried a table saw, but that does not seem to work.

Has anybody had a similar issue and do you have a suggestion on how to straighten the boards with shop equipment. Would a rabbeting jointer do the job?
 

·
Woodworking Firefighter
Joined
·
513 Posts
if you have a table saw you can use it to straight line them. just use a board thats straight like mdf, plywood etc and attach a couple hold down clamps to them to hold the poplar boards onto the straight edge board. then just run the board through the table saw making sure that the straight edge board is riding the fence. i wish i had a picture of what im talking about but im sure if you googled it you could find it.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
27,756 Posts
Couple of other ways on the TS

I just read and old FFW Tips book on this. They show a piece of angle steel or aluminum taped to the curved edge against the fence legside down. You could make a wood/ply jig, with a cleat that's the same thickness as your planks on the bottom, and a wider top piece to capture the plank, a shallow, but wide "L", which just sits on top of the plank and runs against the fence on the right hand edge. Just screw the cleat and the top piece together, right hand edges flush to ride the fence.That's a pretty quick way to get one straight side off the saw blade.
Another way is to make a straight line sled, with a steel or wooden runner in the miter gauge slot 3/4" x 3/8", and a piece of 1/2" ply or mdf on top. Use hold downs or 36 grit floor sanding paper on top to "secure" the plank. If you run the ply wide to the left of the blade 1/2" or so, and then saw it, the saw cut will be your cutline when you first make the sled. You can just lay the planks on at the best angle and run the sled through. A sled 6-8 ft long depending on the length of your planks.
A jointer will take a long time and a lot of passes if you have many to correct. :yes: bill
The photos below are not the exact idea, but give the concept for the first jig described above. The cleat should be flush right for the tablesaw jig. This was jig was made for straight line resawing on the bandsaw.
 

Attachments

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,027 Posts
if you have a table saw you can use it to straight line them. just use a board thats straight like mdf, plywood etc and attach a couple hold down clamps to them to hold the poplar boards onto the straight edge board. then just run the board through the table saw making sure that the straight edge board is riding the fence. i wish i had a picture of what im talking about but im sure if you googled it you could find it.

That is really an easy way to do it. The straight board edge rides on the fence. you can nail tack it to the backside of the bowed board. The straight board only has to be wide enough to compensate for the bow and reach onto the bowed board a few inches to tack nail it.

You can use nails that have heads, like box nails, or common nails, and you don't have to seat the nail all the way in. Leave the heads up, so you can remove them easily. About 4 nails in 8'-10' are sufficient.

When you are ready to run the two together through the saw, have the bowed board on the bottom, and the straight board on top. If you think about this, all it is, is putting a straight edge on the bowed edge so the opposite side gets cut straight. Once you make one pass, remove the straight board from the top, and you have your board with one straight edge that you can run through the saw. There...see how easy it was.:smile:






 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,544 Posts
That is really an easy way to do it. The straight board edge rides on the fence. you can nail tack it to the backside of the bowed board. The straight board only has to be wide enough to compensate for the bow and reach onto the bowed board a few inches to tack nail it.

You can use nails that have heads, like box nails, or common nails, and you don't have to seat the nail all the way in. Leave the heads up, so you can remove them easily. About 4 nails in 8'-10' are sufficient.

When you are ready to run the two together through the saw, have the bowed board on the bottom, and the straight board on top. If you think about this, all it is, is putting a straight edge on the bowed edge so the opposite side gets cut straight. Once you make one pass, remove the straight board from the top, and you have your board with one straight edge that you can run through the saw. There...see how easy it was.:smile:






Nailing the two boards together makes sense to me. I could not visualize how to do the job with clamps. I guess that you just have to make sure that the nail holes are on what is to be the back of the bowed board.

G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
What Cabinetman said but, in "colors"....

Some "Translations"...in case that you don't like Metric... :smile:
3200mm = 126"
1800mm = 71"
1500mm = 59"
250mm = 10"
30mm = 1¼"

Regards
niki
















 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,461 Posts
Niki,
I gotta say that I love your posts. You not only are one smart man but you know how to pass that on to others by your fantastic pictures and words.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Yea i agree. I'm not gonna lie to you - I have been cutting straight edges with my table saw for some time now and haven't thought of doing it that way. I have a big piece of crazy mango I was about to dimension up and I may very well try that technique. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
what i a rabbet joiner? did you mean a jointer with a rabbeting edge? if you have a jointer then just use that to flatten the edges


a router, a straight edge, and a flush trim bit will also work
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
For an inexpensive straight edge you might consider a steel 2 x 4. I use them frequently with a circular saw to straight line rip. Also use them when laying tile.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top