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Discussion Starter #1
In the very near future, I will have the chance to help restore a condemned brick building. The restoration will be to a first-floor store, and two apartments above. Being a condemned building, access is very simple- walk through the four-foot hole in the side of the building. Therefore, I don't trust leaving tools at the site overnight, and don't have room for them in my apartment. That leaves my only option as storing the tools in my car.

My main question is, what would large temperature changes overnight do to power tools, as well as hand tools such as wooden planes, metal planes, saws, and clamps? Would it make sense to try to bring the hand tools inside overnight? The job might start after the worst of this winter is over, but I don't want to risk ruining my planes.

Thanks for looking, and good luck out there.

Muhheakantuck
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's what I figured, I was just hoping for some way to maybe wrap the tools to at least limit the temperature change. I wasn't sure if a plane sack or canvas wrap would even help.
 

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John
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I store a lot of my tools in a unheated garden shed. When the temps start to get low I bring the battery powered and pneumatic stuff into the basement.:yes:
 
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I keep tools in a van all the time. I have a set for the shop and another for the work van so I don't have to load tools every time I do a job away from the shop. I've never had any trouble. The trunk of a car would be more secure. You can see everything I have through the windows on the side of the van.
 

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Scotty D
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Why not leave wooden tools out?

George
I would not want my wooden planes subjected to extreme temp changes on a daily basis. Maybe it's just me? :huh:

It's the main reason I don't store my wooden hand planes in the freezer. :smile:
 

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Old School
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If you store electric tools in a shed or in a car that's subject to temp and moisture changes, you could get some internal corrosion. If it's that cold outside, you may need to let your tools thaw out before using. The way thieves are nowadays, they won't break into the car to get the tools...they just steal the car.

I had a set of tools used only for on site work and installations. I didn't want to do a pick and choose the day of delivery. I made a plywood rack that clamped on a hand truck. Much of my work was in condos with elevators and long hallways. If you made one of those, you could quickly move the tools inside.





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Scotty D
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I would say that it is just you. I know of no reason that wooden tools would be harmed by the ambient outside environment.

George
I'm not convinced they'd be harmed (people were using wooden tools a long time before there was reliable heating), but it might make them harder to use.

Wood moves as temperatures change, so the wedge on that plane you had perfectly set up yesterday might not fit right tomorrow. Or if you start using it while it's still cold, the blade iron might extend or retract itself as you work, which could be annoying.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I had a set of tools used only for on site work and installations. I didn't want to do a pick and choose the day of delivery. I made a plywood rack that clamped on a hand truck. Much of my work was in condos with elevators and long hallways. If you made one of those, you could quickly move the tools inside.
Thanks cabinetman, I hadn't thought of a rack or anything to put the tools on. I had just figured I'd grab what I need as I need it, but your way makes a lot more sense. It also limits the number of times anyone can see what I keep in the car
 

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If you store electric tools in a shed or in a car that's subject to temp and moisture changes, you could get some internal corrosion. If it's that cold outside, you may need to let your tools thaw out before using. The way thieves are nowadays, they won't break into the car to get the tools...they just steal the car.

I had a set of tools used only for on site work and installations. I didn't want to do a pick and choose the day of delivery. I made a plywood rack that clamped on a hand truck. Much of my work was in condos with elevators and long hallways. If you made one of those, you could quickly move the tools inside.





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That is a GREAT idea. I'm wondering if I can incorporate something like that in our WAREHOUSE. Hmmm off to the drawing board.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
cabinetman, you wouldn't happen to have a picture of that plywood rack would you? I've got a couple ideas, but want to see what you worked with
 
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