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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Through our auction addiction, we've acquired quite a bit of lumber. We put what we could under the outdoor shed and the rest is in our basement.

I need to arrange the wood in the shed because it's basically taking up all of the floor space. It's in 3 large piles now on top of pallets/beams.

For stacking the lumber, do I really need to worry about stickers? The vast majority of this wood is air-dried and was covered for years and years. Using stickers will cause it to take up more space and I don't know where I'd acquire that many stickers either.

If I build a shelf at about 4' high so it's not just one huge stack of wood, about how far apart should I put supports for the lumber...every 2', every 4'?

Ideally I'd like the wood to be nicely stacked, but still relatively accessible.
 

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If I build a shelf at about 4' high so it's not just one huge stack of wood, about how far apart should I put supports for the lumber...every 2', every 4'?

Ideally I'd like the wood to be nicely stacked, but still relatively accessible.
Are the boards longer than the height available? If not consider standing on end.

I have a fixed lumber storage area and I have some board on their sides and some on the face. The ones on the sides are for easy access.

I have my supports every stud = 16in. Wood gets heavy very fast. Too few supports and the stack could fall down. I like to over design such things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A good many of them are too long, but probably most would fit ok on their end. That's a good idea, breaking the storage area into standing and laying sections.

I take it that as long as it's standing mostly upright, then bending/warping shouldn't be a problem? And I guess as long as it stays dry?
 

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Ideally the wood is stacked flat, and stickered between each board. Good to help keep the boards flat, but not so good for access. Hard to always need the board which is at the top.

So alternate stacking arrangements are trading off access for less than ideal stacking.

You want to have minimal stress in the boards. For example stacking at 30 deg would likely cause the boards to bend over time.

Also ensure no water on the floor. End grain will adsorb standing water like a sponge.

So if you stack on end, you want to be as close to vertical as possible, and have a strap around the middle to prevent falling forward. Ideally have something at the bottom to prevent slipping at the foot.
 

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I also like the storage with boards on their sides. It seems to be a bit loose to allow some circulation.

It is important to a constant humidity f possible and a plan to bring boards in for a month or so prior to using to re equilibrated the moisture content.
The storage on end has equal qualities if you have the height for the boards.
I also sort and cut out any/most defects that contribute to non flat boards. It makes the finding good and appropriate boards easier and keeps from storing firewood as if it were good. Protect from moisture/wet and pests that can ruin good wood.
 
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