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Smart and Cool
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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Well theres your problem, cast iron is a royal PITA to weld and prone to stress cracking . Bolts and a bracket will be way better
None of the failures have been the existing CI welds, I don't have the confidence that I could duplicate them though, so I think it's better to bolt the CI part onto a new/better top end.
 

where's my table saw?
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i figured that was so you could hook up two tractors in push/pull configuration 馃槀
like they do with earthmovers
Yup, that would be the way to go, BUT I'd need two identical tractors so they'd have equal pulling power. Or just throw a turbo on my Yanmar engine for some extra horses... LOL.
Never had a loss of power, but I have had a loss of traction.
 

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None of the failures have been the existing CI welds, I don't have the confidence that I could duplicate them though, so I think it's better to bolt the CI part onto a new/better top end.
Aye, when theyre done right cast iron welds are pretty sturdy, but the problem is is that "done right" includes a lengthy pre- and post-heat regimen to prevent a rapid cooling from causing stress fractures, and generally specialized welding electrodes as well. Not impossible to do, but not easy, and i agree, bolting a new part in is a much better fix than trying to weld it
 

mike44
retired carpenter and farmer
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My youngest Son and DIL bought some land, like many they are developing a food plot, and selling produce locally.

I bought a tractor and have had an absolute ball working the land with them, I had no idea my life was so incomplete without a tractor and land. :)

View attachment 431953

Those who have a tractor understand that like most things, the tractor spurs a buying spree of attachments.

I bought a crapped out, slapped together single bottom plow for almost nothing(I later discovered why). First time I used it I hit a root and ripped the top portion of the 3 point mount off, it looked like the welds didn't have adequate penetration even though they looked pretty decent. I didn't think my Lincoln 135 mig was up to the task of re-attaching the mount so I drug out Dad's old Lincoln cracker box. I can remember this machine being around back to the late 60's or early 70's, I'm pretty certain it hasn't been used since the early 2000's. I was concerned that sitting had taken a toll on it so I cleaned it up a bit and checked the leads and power cord, everything looked fine so I shut the 240V circuit off at the breaker, plugged the welder in and turned it on, then flipped the breaker, it came to life with that familiar hum.

I set up a couple of pieces to test on and determined pretty quickly that I suck at striking the rod, and I suck worse at stick welding. I worked on getting the heat set right, and trying to remember to feed the rod, that took a while. I finally set everything up and started running some beads on my repair. The welds looked horrendous, but very solid. Then I finally hit my groove and created a bead that I was actually proud of. I have more work to do, and expect the farm will give me more opportunities to get better at it. I used the plow yesterday, hit another root, and ripped the mount off again. It's apparent I need to re-engineer the implement as the plow is putting too much stress on the top mount, I need to brace it more.

View attachment 431952
It appearts to me that your plow is a light duty plow and probably not made correctly. I am not familiar with your tractor but from the pics I think it is 30 hp or less. You probably can pull two 14" plows in second gear with ease. I would scrap the 1 bottom and either buy a suitable plow or maybe a roto-tiller that is tractor mounted to the 3 pt hitch and power take off. I never used a roto-tiller , only plows and discs. I once had a two bottom 14" plows that was at least 50 years old when I aquired it. Pulled the plow with a Ford 8N in second gear. Only thing that was ever replaced is the points and shins which is actually more maintanence then repair. As far as the welding, can't help here.
mike
 

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Man I am a wire feed guy all the way, if I could justify it I would have a Miller 212 sitting in the shop. My little Lincoln hasn't been used in over a year, it will light right up no issues but I may not have the same humidity issues you do.

I think the striking issue is me, I'm using Lincoln 6013 rods, just have to get used to the drag. They seem to start much better after the first strike too.
Try 7014 rod and you'll never go back to 6013...easy striking and practically welds itself.
 

where's my table saw?
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I found this stick welding cast iron video to be easy enough for the average DIY'er to do.
From the video description:
Stick Welding Cast Iron Repair with Muggy Weld. Cast iron can be tricky to repair because it's prone to cracking. Follow along as I repair a broken cast iron exhaust manifold using Muggy Weld with no pre-heat. For this demonstration I used a 2 step process starting with an electrode ......

 

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I've been charged with coming up with something to break the ground up a little on the rest of the property so we can broadcast some clover seed.

I like the blade too, I'm watching for one at the right price.
imho you will get much use of a 3ph rototiller, you can easily handle a 60" model with that. i bought a used 58" Befco for $1300 that i run on my Lb1914 Kioti.

my 8n is my snow plow tractor. used to use a 3ph rear blade. don't like driving through the snow first, then scraping the snow behind you. so i plowed in reverse. it could push snow backward mile high with no equal (chains and ballast rears). recently rebuilt a front mount snow plow - WOW, love plowing forward now, much easier on the neck. So, if you get much snow, you can get a (power angle) blade to replace your bucket.
 

Smart and Cool
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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
imho you will get much use of a 3ph rototiller, you can easily handle a 60" model with that. i bought a used 58" Befco for $1300 that i run on my Lb1914 Kioti.

my 8n is my snow plow tractor. used to use a 3ph rear blade. don't like driving through the snow first, then scraping the snow behind you. so i plowed in reverse. it could push snow backward mile high with no equal (chains and ballast rears). recently rebuilt a front mount snow plow - WOW, love plowing forward now, much easier on the neck. So, if you get much snow, you can get a (power angle) blade to replace your bucket.
I'm watching tillers, waiting for the right price on a good used one.

There is a divide between the way I would do it, and the way my DIL wants to do it. She is on an organic/regenerative path so regular tilling isn't on her agenda, just the first time in a plot. Some of that relates to the Johnson grass that is pervasive in this area. They tarp the plot for 30 days to kill it, then run the pigs, chickens, and sheep on it for a week or two. If the Johnson grass it isn't dead when you till it just spreads the rhizomes around and makes it worse. She's throttled me back on brush hogging too, I would clear more of the property, she wants to get goats to clear portions instead of my cutting it down.

I've been impressed with the 35HP Kioti so far, I stepped up from a 25HP, glad I did, it does most everything we need it to do. It's also 4wd with a locking rear diff, I have gotten it stuck in some sticky we clay on the property, but the front bucket pushed me out no problem.

Right now most of the work is to get a winter cover crop in place with planting starting early next year for her spring crops. We did drop 1000 tulip bulbs in this week, that is what I was trying to use the plow for. She's finding in addition to produce, flowers at the market are a pretty high margin product.
Sky Plant Leaf Natural landscape Road surface
 

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i get the no till concept, works well for large farms who are willing to spray to keep the "unwanted" plants at bay. im a heavy mulcher also. but its not enough to keep the unwanted plants down, at least in my area. so i plow and till. have a disc but like the tiller better!

those 3510 are nice units. hst or 9 sp?
the daedong diesels are tough engines, i was leary at first, but love it now!
 

Smart and Cool
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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
i get the no till concept, works well for large farms who are willing to spray to keep the "unwanted" plants at bay. im a heavy mulcher also. but its not enough to keep the unwanted plants down, at least in my area. so i plow and till. have a disc but like the tiller better!

those 3510 are nice units. hst or 9 sp?
the daedong diesels are tough engines, i was leary at first, but love it now!
DIL is absolutely no spray.

We get mulch from the local green waste dump, they provide it for free. Renting a dump trailer again in a couple of weekends to replenish the pile, will probably make 6-8 runs with a 7X16, will be going all weekend...

It's the HST, wanted it easy to use for the DIL, also opted for the SE.
 

Smart and Cool
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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
when you say green, do they guarantee no chemicals have been sprayed on their waste? that is why i do not get mulch from ours, anything could be in there...
It is all trees, but you have a legit point, no telling if it has been sprayed, or had any chemicals used on them.

I will have to discuss that with her.
 

Smart and Cool
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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Organized all of the old rods from Dad's place. Lots of 7014 in different diameters, 6013 the same, and quite a few NI-CI rods for welding cast. Looks like I have several things to play with once I get my plan to move forward.

These rods are old, have been in plastic bags, they look OK, but I read a lot about putting 7 series rods in the oven to make certain they are dry, is this really necessary? Or just for welds that will undergo inspection?
 

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7018 is the one thats really susceptible to moisture, 7014 isnt quite as touchy about it. If the rods were in sealed plastic bags, theyre probably fine to use. Give em a test, if you get a lot of spatter or porosity in the weld then yeah, they need to be dried, otherwise youre good to go
 

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7018 is susceptible to everything 馃槀
if your rods are old, stick it to the metal and let it heat up a bit. the rod will weld a lot better (sometimes)
 

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Really enjoyed this thread. Have owned tractors for the last 25 years. If you own a tractor, you must have a welder. A lathe is also nice to have. Have made a support frame for my loader forks, modified a truck snow plow for use on my tractor, a thumb for my mini ex, numerous repairs pins and bushings. Use the tractor with forks all the time to move rough cut lumber. You will find though as you get older it will be harder to attach and remove tractor equipment because of its weight. I have started selling off stuff, tiller, snow plow, post hole digger, and rake. Loader frame stays on tractor more these days than bucket.
 

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If you own a tractor, you must have a welder.
yep - or any other sort of "Old Iron" or restoring any of the "Vintage" vehicles and machines.

welcome "back" - where you been for the past decade ??
 
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