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Discussion Starter #1
I seen this steady rest in a video and was wondering how it worked. It looks like it uses string to support the piece. Does the piece just spin inside the string? Seems like it would build up a lot of heat.

Anyone have any experience with a setup like this?

steadyrest.jpg

Here's the video I seen the rest in...

 

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They work beautifully but it's only to stop the piece from excessive flopping. It does not stop chatter. People use these when turning what's called a Trembler which is a very long extremely thin turning. It takes a lot of skill to turn one of these things and the string steady simply keeps it from breaking under it's own weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks john, I was originally wondering how they kept the string from burning the piece but after thinking about it (and your explanation) I don't guess they can spin them very fast anyways.

Neat pieces, that was the first time I had seen anything like that.
 

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Actually they do spin them pretty fast but the string doesn't really touch with any pressure unless the piece tries to wobble.
 

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Turning Wood Into Art
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dmh said:
I seen this steady rest in a video and was wondering how it worked. It looks like it uses string to support the piece. Does the piece just spin inside the string? Seems like it would build up a lot of heat.

Anyone have any experience with a setup like this?

Here's the video I seen the rest in...

Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4JdA9zdUeI&feature=g-vrec
while my preference is for things with some kind of practice value I thank you for that link. There is no doubt to the talent and craftsmanship of those individuals. Totally awesome video

As for the string supports I imagine due to such a small diameter there is little friction. It is also possible the string may be coated with some kind of lubricant.

Dave The Turning Cowboy
 

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Remember that with a 1/16" dowel (1.8mm is 0.07" and 1/16" is 0.0625". That's close enough right?) even though it can turn at 1,000 RPM, it isn't moving fast. It's moving 3,000/16" every minute which is about 15 feet per minute. Rub a 15 foot string across a piece of wood over a full minute and it doesn't generate much heat. That's about a quarter inch per second. There just isn't enough friction to amount to a hill of beans. Want to turn 2,000 RPM instead? Eh, ok, 1/2" per second now.
 
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