Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello I hope I am at the right place. Basically I am looking for tips for a project that I wish to do, I want to get into woodworking but I want to start by making a woodworker bench that I can use.

I have very limited knowledge and zero experience with this so please feel free to spoon feed me. I have done research, but I'm at a point where I think I need some guidance.

I have no tools except a power drill and a hand saw. What tools I should get as a start is one of the things I'd like to ask you guys about, but I was thinking I could explain how I'm planning to make this bench now and then you may give me feedback on what part sounds like a bad idea and what doesnt!

Once bench is done what I aim to create is smaller things, I like to DIY electronics and want to be able to enclose my projects in wood. Some examples of relevant projects: wooden keyboard case, arcade joystick, etc..

For the bench I want to keep it simple, I'm thinking just gonna buy some materials at a local shop so they will be (I guess) fairly processed already

Here's an example of what Im thinking I'd want to go for
http://jennyshandarbeten.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Garage-Workbench-Plans-Picture.jpg

This is without a plate, but im also hoping I can buy a good enough plate at a shop and attach that on a frame like that. I'd buy a vise to mount as well, though I have no experience with that.

Ok so here's the tools I imagine I need, and I want to keep powertools to a minimum to save money, but I will buy powertools if they are far superior and doesnt cost a fortune.

Hand saw for fitting materials (got a saw, no idea what kind)
yardstick to measure (got already)
screws and bolts I guess
Drill (already got)
pencil (got)
level maybe (got)

Any tips here? I don't mind some physical exercise because I am have an office job and I wanna move a little bit, but Im not looking to torment myself! Do you think it is realistic for me to get this right with just a handsaw? Any tools for this job that you'd want to use?


Ok then finish, I am very interested in practicing finishing, because that's something I really wanna do on my future projects. I've done some research here and it has made me confused.

I know planers (the manual hand planers) are used to finish, I am interested in those since as far as I understand I can also use those to make small corrections for example if one piece needs just a little bit shaving off to be the right length, and also to make smooth surfaces. I know theres many different kinds of planers, and I wouldn't mind getting some different ones if it can help me.

Then theres also electrical planers which looks very aggressive, I feel kind of interested in those as they seem nice for say depressing just part of a surface?

People who use planers to finish also seem to be using a scrape? And then fine sandpaper possibly after.

Then theres those who only use sandpaper, and those who does it manually by hand and with an electric tool ..

What do you recommend? I dont need it to be perfect, I mainly want to practice and I really like the idea of learning to use a planer. Will it be too tedious? Any tools I havent listed that I should get right away, or issues I havent addressed?

Really appreciate help, remember im clueless!:smile3:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,644 Posts
Welcome aboard.

For the frame you posted, you could check out Jay Bates on You Tube. He has plans and videos of his bench.

For a top, you could buy a solid core door and attach it to the top. Heavy, solid and thick.

If you are serious about woodworking, a circular saw would be minimum. Search for circular saw cutting guide. Make a couple of them.

Sooner or later, you should consider a table saw to be the center of your work shop. Everything revolves around it. Cross cut sled and a ripping sled for the table saw will help a lot.

Good luck.
Mike

Here is a picture of my old work bench. As I mentioned heavy and solid and flat. That is important. Over the course of several years, I added a pair of Kreg Klamp tracks and an extension to give more working area. I have built many cabinets (and other projects) on this table. I have since replaced it with a new workbench/table, but that is another story.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
As stringer said a circular saw is a minimum. I have done a lot of projects using a circular saw. I'm looking into getting a miter saw soon and want a table saw. But a circular saw with a good blade will get you farther than you think


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,885 Posts
Welcome here! Agree with other posts to add a circular saw, blade, guide, etc. to your tools. Also consider a variety of good drill bits for those bolt holes to assemble your bench. Always buy the best that fits your $ budget - or maybe a little more. Keep your tools clean, sharp, enjoy your stay, and be safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Add a square to your needs, at minimum one of the 9" triangular ones found at the box stores. With it you'll also have 45-deg capability along with 90-deg assurance.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
27,753 Posts
You need a bench to build a bench ...?

You need a way to hold your pieces for sawing and drilling etc. So to just get going there are several solutions. Find a old office desk, and discarded cabinet base, or buy a Work Jaws or Stanley Workmate with built in clamping jaws. No point in getting hurt by a moving workpiece that is not fastened securely. I do not recommend saw horse aas they are not stable, too light and have no means for clamping. A solid core door makes a great work surface... from Recycle Rehab or Salvation Army or a trash day find. :smile3:

A circular saw is necessary, because a handsaw is accurate only in experienced hands and for precise joints, you need accuracy. You will use the circular saw with a guide either for cross cutting or ripping and for frame members or plywood.

A powered drill is a minimum also. Cheap enough at Home Depot etc. A set of twist drill bits for making holes for bolts also.

Hammers, wrenches, screwdrivers, a framing square or Speed Square are other must haves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
646 Posts
No one has as yet addressed your inquiry about planes. I'll initiate that response, and go a bit further.
The hand tools are referred to as "planes", not "planers". The powered stationary tools are the planers. The powered handheld tool seems to be referred to both ways. For what you state that you intend to do, I don't believe the handheld tool is something you would use much, if at all.
The hand planes, however, would be quite useful, and fun to use. A jointer, a jack & a block plane would be a good start.
Scrapers have their place, as do sanders.
Handsaws can be accurate with a little practice. Of course, as with planes, chisels, and other cutting tools, they should be sharp, and be the proper tool for the job. Don't crosscut with a ripsaw, don't rip with a crosscut saw.
That said, a powered circular saw and a couple of good blades would probably be less expensive than an assortment of good quality handsaws, albeit much less fun to use.
Measuring/layout tools are items I would recommend purchasing. Get good ones, and get them as needed. Check them for accuracy. A square is not necessarily square, for instance. Check before buying, if possible.
The Lie-Nielsen website has a lot of good information regarding the use and care of hand tools. They deal only in hand tools, and provide a lot of info regarding same. Their tools are pretty much high-end, so don't let their prices blow your hair back. Good tools for less money can be found, both new and used.
If you are wanting to do hand tool work, build a bench for that. You'll need one that allows you to capture your workpiece in different ways. That usually means vises, dog holes, planing stops, holdfasts, and an ability to use clamps.
Finally, many threads on this site address, in depth, the things I've mentioned here. Search them, and digest them. But keep in mind your needs and wants, and proceed accordingly. Don't think all these pretty, shiny toys are necessary to start out. Pick a project (such as the workbench) determine the tools you will use for the project, get them, then begin. Then on to the next project, let your project and your preference on how you want to do it determine what tools you will acquire. Rinse and repeat.
Welcome to the wonderful world of woodworking!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
You need a way to hold your pieces for sawing and drilling etc. So to just get going there are several solutions. Find a old office desk, and discarded cabinet base, or buy a Work Jaws or Stanley Workmate with built in clamping jaws. No point in getting hurt by a moving workpiece that is not fastened securely. I do not recommend saw horse aas they are not stable, too light and have no means for clamping. A solid core door makes a great work surface... from Recycle Rehab or Salvation Army or a trash day find. :smile3:

On my saw horses I added a section of 2x8 on each one so I could clamp down whatever I'm working on. It had done me well for a few years. Then again my most extensive project was the work bench in my basement to work on my hobby stuff.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,232 Posts
One of the simplest of workbenches is using a solid core door as the top of the workbench. A used door can be found for little $$ and will get you started. You have the tools now to build a Saw horse. Two Saw horses can hold your door to start your first workbench.
Other tools you will need include a good speed square, a framing square and a combination square.
A small hand held jig saw can cut many of the electrical projects you have plans for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,644 Posts
One of the simplest of workbenches is using a solid core door as the top of the workbench. A used door can be found for little $$ and will get you started.
You got that right. I bought one at the Habitat ReStore place in Houston. It was less than $10. :surprise2: Eight something, I think.

After cutting it to the desired size, I attached a hardwood edge around all four sides and laminated a piece of white Formica to the top. It served me well for about 4 years. Many projects were built on that work bench.

Note: The top wasn't attached to the frame. It was so heavy it just sat there. I added some cleats underneath the edges so the top was captured and couldn't slide around.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Wow this got a lot more and a lot better answers than I was hoping for. I can tell you guys put effort into your replies and that you are passionate about woodworking. I really appreciate these answers and I feel they indeed answer my initial questions and more.

I've saved everything on my computer and I will do some more research based on what I've learned here. I'll be sure to spend some time on this forum and see what wisdom I can grab here and there.

Thanks everyone, you are doing the community a great service by being so helpful :thumbsup:
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top