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mike44
retired carpenter and farmer
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474 Posts
The book recommends a draw bored mortise and tenon. If I don't use wood glue, I would probably be able to knock it down...once.

I will also have a 8" jointer, cabinet saw, 3HP bandsaw and large metal box in my basement that will have to move when I leave, so I will already have a ton of heavy stuff to haul out.
If draw bored is what I refer to as draw peg construction, you can knock it down and re-install as many times as needed.
You would probably have to bore the pegs out and make and install new ones. Glue is not needed on the mortise or pegs. I used to make industrial lab benches from common 2x4's. I also made 7 woodworkers benches from beech.
Most of the lab benches were either fir, yellow pine or what was called white wood , this is also known as hemlock spruce.
The boards were machined to 3-1/4" x 1-5/16". Most were 27-1/2" wide with a total of 20 boards laminated.
mike
 

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mike44
retired carpenter and farmer
Joined
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474 Posts
The draw bores are off center, so the hole of the tenon is 1/16" closer to the shoulder. It deform the peg enough that it curves inside the joint and also deform the holes. I could use standard pegs to fit them, but I worry it wouldn't prevent wobble.

Breaking down the bench is really a tertiary concern of mine. I will not modify my plans to make it easier to move in 15 or 20 years. If I am ever successful enough to buy a mansion, I can afford good movers.
Draw peg construction is an excellent way to go. Where I live this construction was also used to fasten studs to timbers on homes built before 1900. A typical house was built with 6x or 8x square or rectangular beams. Studs were 3x, 4x , or 5x logs that had a large tenon at each end . The beams were mortised. Pegs ,usually 2 per stud were offset . The walls were framed on the ground. Took several strong men to raise it.
I shaved a point on the peg so the peg does not splinter the exit hole. Don't worry about wobble. Once the pegs are driven , the joint will tight and stay that way. As I mentionrd before I have built many benches, at least 200 softwood and 7 hardwood benches. Never had to re-do a draw peg joint. Never had to use glue either. I do know some people brush glue on the pegs, a waste of glue in my opinion. Dowels are fine for pegs, smaller pegs can be pointed in a pencil sharpener. 3/8" would be about the largest dowel that would fit in a crank type pencil sharpener. A dozen different ways to put the point on, hatchet, disk sander, draw knife etc.
mike
 
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