Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 20 of 120 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,047 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went to 2 home depots and 1 Lowes today. I picked up mostly what I need for the workbench.

Picking out the lumber was a decent amount of work and sorting through the boards for nice ones took some time. The plans called for 9x 8' 2x12s, but I didn't find many quality 8' boards. The selection at a few stores was minimal, and I sorted through what was plentiful. I basically substituted 3 16' boards for 6 8' boards. I also got the 10' boards because they were straight and knot free. I only got boards with 5 or more growth rings through the center, no pith, and minimal knots. I also picked straight boards as I could, but we will see as they dry.

My plan is to make the bench slightly narrower than the plans (21') but add a narrow tool tray (5-6").

Bicycle Wheel Tire Bicycle wheel Tread


3x 16' 2x12
1x 12' 2x12
4x 10' 2x12
1x 8' 2x12

2x 10' 2x10
1x 12' 2x10
 
  • Like
Reactions: AJ. and TobyC

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,047 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good luck! I'm eagerly following this because a workbench is on my list.
:)
I do want to keep this thread kinda going, but I really expect the longest part of this timeline to be me waiting for the pine to dry out enough to work. I am hoping to rip them around Thanksgiving, and get the bench really started around Christmas.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TobyC

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,047 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Gotcha, makes sense now.
Southern yellow pine is denser and the larger stock tends to warp less as it dries (hopefully).

Also, because it's wider, when I rip it, I won't have as much flat grain trying to cup. I'll basically have one quarter sawn edge and one rift sawn edge.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TobyC

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
Southern yellow pine is denser and the larger stock tends to warp less as it dries (hopefully).

Also, because it's wider, when I rip it, I won't have as much flat grain trying to cup. I'll basically have one quarter sawn edge and one rift sawn edge.
Interesting I have a stack of 12' former roof rafters that are 2 x 8s that I'm thinking of using for mine. I'm not sure how old they are, but the wood is not light like pine, maybe spruce or fir. My workbench is going to be smaller than most because my space is minimal, so I may not need more than 2x4s, which I plan to use for the legs and frame as well, doubled up. They are pretty straight. I'm trying to use what I already have, I don't expect to need it to last a hundred years, I'll be happy to get 5-7 years' use out of it myself. lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,047 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Interesting I have a stack of 12' former roof rafters that are 2 x 8s that I'm thinking of using for mine. I'm not sure how old they are, but the wood is not light like pine, maybe spruce or fir. My workbench is going to be smaller than most because my space is minimal, so I may not need more than 2x4s, which I plan to use for the legs and frame as well, doubled up. They are pretty straight. I'm trying to use what I already have, I don't expect to need it to last a hundred years, I'll be happy to get 5-7 years' use out of it myself. lol
Well, southern yellow pine is one of the denser softwoods, and common joist material in the Midwest and Eastern US.

2x8 ripped in half is still a decent thickness for the top. How many do you have? If you want to make a 6' bench, each one will give you 5" or 5.5" of width on your top. I'm tired of a bench that scoots around the basement floor, so I'm going for heft.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TobyC

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
Very nice looking stock and quite an exciting project. I built the bench I still use in 1975 or 76 out of oak. They get better with age. You will not regret allowing the wood extra time to season before you glue up the top. 21" is a good width in my opinion. 18" is a little narrow. 24" is definitely too wide. These were called benches, not tables, for a reason.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,047 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'd go ahead and rip them now. Get that internal stress relieved, then sticker them and let them freak out for a month.

5" is a very thick top!
Yeah...I might hate life if I decide to move and want to bring the bench with me... then again, it was about $250 in wood, so I can also say I rented it for $25/year for the next 10 years.

I need to rip them in my basement, and I have a few projects I want to complete before I bring them down, plus a family vacation...I think they will live in the garage for about a month, but I do want to get them up above the concrete floor...maybe they'll be a few lbs lighter when I actually haul them downstairs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,047 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
How feasible is it to make the bench with some variety of mortise and tenon so it can be knocked down?
The book recommends a draw bored mortise and tenon. If I don't use wood glue, I would probably be able to knock it down...once.

I will also have a 8" jointer, cabinet saw, 3HP bandsaw and large metal box in my basement that will have to move when I leave, so I will already have a ton of heavy stuff to haul out.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bob Bengal

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
I'd go ahead and rip them now. Get that internal stress relieved, then sticker them and let them freak out for a month.

5" is a very thick top!
AGREE! When ripping wide 2X SYP, especially the stuff grown real fast is going bow and twist. It's not the moisture, it's the grain. You don't want to wait for everything to dry and then discover you have 30% waste after you rip them and then need to wait for the replacement to dry.

FWIW, right of wrong I made a 2' thick, 30" X 144" top from SYP and didn't let it dry and never moved/checked. I used biscuits to help with quicker glue ups. I did (2) 15" wide section, let the glue dry, run it through the planer and drum sander then glued the two smaller pieces together so I only had to hand work one joint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
The book recommends a draw bored mortise and tenon. If I don't use wood glue, I would probably be able to knock it down...once.

I will also have a 8" jointer, cabinet saw, 3HP bandsaw and large metal box in my basement that will have to move when I leave, so I will already have a ton of heavy stuff to haul out.
My first bench top was a salvaged section of a bowling alley, heart pine with hard maple edges. If I remember correctly it was a type of tongue and grove (Not sure of the correct term) joint. I don't think it was glued but held together with threaded rods every 12" or 16". That was like 40 years ago so my memory could be "off"
 

·
Premium Member
A cat made me do it.
Joined
·
1,210 Posts
AGREE! When ripping wide 2X SYP, especially the stuff grown real fast is going bow and twist.
A year of so I wanted a couple of decent 2x4s for shop use, the ones in the big box stores were junk. So I tried a straight 2x8 SYP, even before I finished the rip it was if it was trying to cross it's fingers. :eek:
 

·
mike44
retired carpenter and farmer
Joined
·
452 Posts
The book recommends a draw bored mortise and tenon. If I don't use wood glue, I would probably be able to knock it down...once.

I will also have a 8" jointer, cabinet saw, 3HP bandsaw and large metal box in my basement that will have to move when I leave, so I will already have a ton of heavy stuff to haul out.
If draw bored is what I refer to as draw peg construction, you can knock it down and re-install as many times as needed.
You would probably have to bore the pegs out and make and install new ones. Glue is not needed on the mortise or pegs. I used to make industrial lab benches from common 2x4's. I also made 7 woodworkers benches from beech.
Most of the lab benches were either fir, yellow pine or what was called white wood , this is also known as hemlock spruce.
The boards were machined to 3-1/4" x 1-5/16". Most were 27-1/2" wide with a total of 20 boards laminated.
mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,047 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
If draw bored is what I refer to as draw peg construction, you can knock it down and re-install as many times as needed.
You would probably have to bore the pegs out and make and install new ones. Glue is not needed on the mortise or pegs. I used to make industrial lab benches from common 2x4's. I also made 7 woodworkers benches from beech.
Most of the lab benches were either fir, yellow pine or what was called white wood , this is also known as hemlock spruce.
The boards were machined to 3-1/4" x 1-5/16". Most were 27-1/2" wide with a total of 20 boards laminated.
mike
The draw bores are off center, so the hole of the tenon is 1/16" closer to the shoulder. It deform the peg enough that it curves inside the joint and also deform the holes. I could use standard pegs to fit them, but I worry it wouldn't prevent wobble.

Breaking down the bench is really a tertiary concern of mine. I will not modify my plans to make it easier to move in 15 or 20 years. If I am ever successful enough to buy a mansion, I can afford good movers.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
31,248 Posts
Another means of knocking down a bench would be "wedged tenons". They can always be tightened up if the need arises.
You should watch this method of making through leg tenons before you laminate your top. It makes those type of tenons FAR easier than chopping them through 5" thick stock!

Same idea from Christopher Schwarz (who should keep his hands in his pockets when he talks):
 
1 - 20 of 120 Posts
Top