Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
All,
I am in the early stages of designing a kitchen table. My wife wants me to build something similar to the table shown below. She wants to paint the base off white or cream ( is painting a no-no on a woodworking forum?) with a dark stain on the top. A friend and I scored a bunch of walnut boards and I would like to use them for the top. Since the bottom will be painted I am thinking about going with pine to keep the costs down. The legs can can be pricey even in pine if I have to order them online so I am going to do some research and see if there is somebody local who can turn them for me. I certainly don't mind paying, but I would love to watch them being turned and learn a little in the process.

image.jpg

Before I get too far along can you guys tell me if you see any fatal flaws with this plan? Also, any suggestions on where to find the legs. I have seen similar ones on websites for around $80 or $90 each in pine.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,943 Posts
Your picture scale looks like a coffee table. What will be the dimensions of your table.

Personally I would use a better grade of wood than pine.
even fur or popular would be better in my book. I also would not waste walnut with a dark stain. I like walnut natural.

George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
I agree, pine is a bit soft and less dimensionally stable than say maybe poplar?

There is not a lot of lateral stability to the design. The joinery needs to be very solid to prevent the table from wobbling.

Bret
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
+1 with George. Please do not stain the walnut, it is already dark and deserves to have the grain natural.

I am not fond of turning pine. Tears too easily, too soft - gets a ding just by looking at it.

One manufacturer of turned wood is Osborne, just be prepared for sticker shock.

http://www.osbornewood.com/6-8-wide-island-legs.cfm

If you find a local person willing to turn these, you may save some money by laminating the blanks from ripping pieces from boards and gluing together. Since you are going to paint these, the paint will cover the glue lines.

I would select a tight grained wood for the legs, such as beech.

If there is a local woodturning club, this is a good place to start looking for someone willing to take on a commission.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the feedback.

The table will be 96"x43"x30". I will use something better for the base like poplar. Do you have any other suggestions on how to make the base more stable?

I agree that the walnut will be dark enough without stain, not sure what I was thinking. Should I use a paste wax or something else? I don't want a really glossy finish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,392 Posts
Thanks for the feedback.

The table will be 96"x43"x30". I will use something better for the base like poplar. Do you have any other suggestions on how to make the base more stable?

I agree that the walnut will be dark enough without stain, not sure what I was thinking. Should I use a paste wax or something else? I don't want a really glossy finish.
If you made apron connecting the four legs at the top an inch or so taller and then connected the legs and aprons using a locking angle block that would help.

Bret
 

·
Making sawdust in MS
Joined
·
4,000 Posts
Looks similar to the table I made for my daughter.

image-123074310.jpg


For the legs I glued three 8/4 boards together and then turned them.

image-3163707238.jpg


My daughter painted the base, to match the chairs she had bought. I left the top natural, just poly. Cypress with walnut breadboard ends, and inlays. A walnut top would look good with a painted base.
 

Attachments

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
Should I use a paste wax or something else? I don't want a really glossy finish.
Paste wax will not last long on a table. I would go for a film finish like poly. Available in satin so will not be glossy.

For water based I like the General Finish Enduro-Var.

No fumes, brush on easily, feathers well. Need several coats and have to let the final coat cure before use and before any heavy sanding.

http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2081078/30239/general-finishes-endurovar-top-coat-satin-quart.aspx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Painted base

Nothing wrong with painting the base at all. In fact one look you may like is a painted distressed base. Basically you paint it solid white, or really whatever color you like that works with the room. After it's dry hit it with a palm sander at random spots to give it a natural wear look. Once done blow it off with an air gun then apply rustoleum dark walnut decorative glaze. Wipe the excess off with a damp rag, allow to dry then coat in matte poly. This finish looks great.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
Yeah as others mentioned you are going to pay for those legs. The idea about going to a local turning club is a very good one. Anything above that and you can (and should) buy yourself a used lathe and a couple of tools and turn them yourself. Since they will be painted expert turning wont be required. For the finish I would use multiple layers of milk paint on the base followed by tung oil and then wax; for the tops I would go with Waterlox Original, about three coats if wiped on, maybe one more if necessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the finishing tips guys. I am going to play around with a few scrap pieces and see what looks the best with the wood I have.

I am going to ask around on our local woodworking forum and see if somebody is up for turning the legs. Stay tuned....
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
Yeah as others mentioned you are going to pay for those legs. The idea about going to a local turning club is a very good one. Anything above that and you can (and should) buy yourself a used lathe and a couple of tools and turn them yourself. Since they will be painted expert turning wont be required.
+1. :yes: Those legs would be easy to turn. Getting a used lathe, and a few tools would be a great start. Do some practice pieces, and you'll see how easy you can get the hang of it. Years ago, I bought an Asian import display model for $65. One leg will cost more than that. I wouldn't use any kind of wax at all. I would use a film finish as discussed.






.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Well I had hoped I would be done with this project right now, but life got in the way and instead I am just now finalizing the design. Please take a look at the sketches I have attached and feel free to provide feedback on materials, joints, dimensions, or anything else. I apologize for the crappy scan quality in the markups PDF.
I plan to use mortise and tenon for the apron/leg and stretcher/leg joints. Should I also use a corner plate for the apron/leg joints or is that overkill? I may go with a half lap joint where the stretchers meet depending on how good I am at mortise and tenons.....I have never done them before.
I plan to use soft maple for the base. I have spoken with the folks at Osborne and they do not work with poplar so they recommended soft maple because it also takes paint very well. Sadly I haven't had much luck finding somebody to turn the legs locally. I am leaning towards just sucking it up and ordering the legs even though they are $79 each. It is painful, but I figure a good used lathe is going to be at least $200 plus attachments and each leg is about 5 bf so there is another $60-$80. The top is still walnut but I haven't decided on a finish yet. I plan to test a few different finishes on scrap to get an idea of what I...and more importantly what my wife likes.
Alright let me know what you think guys. I am in way over my head here but that probably goes without saying.
 

Attachments

1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top