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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking at a Stanley Bedrock 607 jointer on CL, seller wants $40 for it. I had him take several up close photos of it, it's got a corrugated sole. It's going to need a full restore though.

Any thoughts? I've never restored a bedrock before.
 

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Restoring a Bedrock should not be much different than a normal Stanley. Only the frog adjustment is different.

Corrugated sole does not make any difference in use. I have a few vintage Stanley's with corrugated sole. I am not fond of the corrugated sole, but this is personal. My old eyes find it harder to sight a blade on a corrugated sole. Small thing.

$40 is a good price - if all it needs is labour. If any parts missing or needing to replace, then may be different.

When you get the pictures look at the blade. If the lateral adjustment lever is longer than the blade, it means the blade has been sharpened a lot. Happens. These were tools used by people to earn a living. Some have been sharpened a lot. If the blade has been sharpened enough to remove the laminated hardened steel edge, then it will dull faster and so need to be sharpened more often.

Look for cracks. Dings are common. Easy for a plane to be knocked off a bench.

Broken knob and / or tote are common. Look for these to have correct hardware. Often a screw is lost and someone force fits new hardware which is not the same diameter or thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Restoring a Bedrock should not be much different than a normal Stanley. Only the frog adjustment is different.

Corrugated sole does not make any difference in use. I have a few vintage Stanley's with corrugated sole. I am not fond of the corrugated sole, but this is personal. My old eyes find it harder to sight a blade on a corrugated sole. Small thing.

$40 is a good price - if all it needs is labour. If any parts missing or needing to replace, then may be different.

When you get the pictures look at the blade. If the lateral adjustment lever is longer than the blade, it means the blade has been sharpened a lot. Happens. These were tools used by people to earn a living. Some have been sharpened a lot. If the blade has been sharpened enough to remove the laminated hardened steel edge, then it will dull faster and so need to be sharpened more often.

Look for cracks. Dings are common. Easy for a plane to be knocked off a bench.

Broken knob and / or tote are common. Look for these to have correct hardware. Often a screw is lost and someone force fits new hardware which is not the same diameter or thread.
Thanks for the reply Dave!

I actually really like the corrugated soles. I mentioned it strictly for the reason that they're less common than solid soles. Someone once told me that Stanley wouldn't tell people the difference between the two, and that it was probably a publicity stunt to sell more planes :).

The iron isn't that big of a deal to me, I tend to scrap the iron/chip breaker and buy a HOCK replacement, I like the added heft to reduce blade chatter. Do you know if the iron in a Bed Rock is the same as a normal Stanley?

When I go over there today I'm bringing my granite stone and some shims to see how much work I'm going to have to put in to it. I'm excited for it though. The last jointer I bought didn't restore well and I've been looking for another good deal for a while now.

I'll keep you guys posted.
 

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The iron isn't that big of a deal to me, I tend to scrap the iron/chip breaker and buy a HOCK replacement, I like the added heft to reduce blade chatter. Do you know if the iron in a Bed Rock is the same as a normal Stanley?
I do not have any Bedrock planes, but they appear to be the same as the Stanley-Bailey. However, not all Stanley-Bailey are exactly the same.

I have some Veritas replacement blades which had the the following comment
"Due to minor manufacturing variations over the last century, the pawl on the end of the lateral adjust lever on older planes may have to be filed slightly to fit in the blade slot"

I recently purchased a Veritas PM-V11 blade for a Stanley-Bailey No. 5. I like it. Ron Hock makes good blades, but you may want to also look at the Veritas PM-V11.

http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?cat=1,41182&p=43698&ap=1
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I do not have any Bedrock planes, but they appear to be the same as the Stanley-Bailey. However, not all Stanley-Bailey are exactly the same.

I have some Veritas replacement blades which had the the following comment
"Due to minor manufacturing variations over the last century, the pawl on the end of the lateral adjust lever on older planes may have to be filed slightly to fit in the blade slot"

I recently purchased a Veritas PM-V11 blade for a Stanley-Bailey No. 5. I like it. Ron Hock makes good blades, but you may want to also look at the Veritas PM-V11.

http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?cat=1,41182&p=43698&ap=1

Thanks for that link! I hadn't been able to find a good place to buy the veritas iron/chip breaker combo's besides Woodcraft. Actually, now that I look at it, they're all sold out :(

I picked up the plane during lunch, it looks like a really solid plane to me. Its just old. The lady I bought it from said she was happy I was buying it to use it because it was her great grandfathers passed down to her father. I told her it's going to get a good cleaning and tune up and that it will be used for many more years.

The blade is about 1/2 and inch shorter than the adjuster and it's obvious it got a LOT of use. Damn thing weighs 20 pounds and is about 24 inches long. The tote and handle are both in great shape, but I'm still going to replace them. I have some nice rosewood I bought and a template for the handle that I want to get some use out of.

I was worried about a repaired crack along the side of it from what the pictures showed, turns out it was just a scratch that got paint in it.

This one is going to be a fun restore I'm sure.
 

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Sounds like a win-win.

FYI, Lee Valley have templates for the Stanley totes.

http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/pag...62&cat=1,46168

Stanley totes evolved over the decades, so the Lee Valley template reflects the more modern evolution.

If you have the existing tote, I would use this to trace the outline and especially to denote the angle for the screw.

I show my details on making a tote in this restoration thread starting post #48.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f11/plane-restore-round-4-a-48338/index3/

This is forum member TimeTestedTools restoration blog.

http://timetestedtools.wordpress.com...re-the-dw-way/

I hope you post the before and after pictures.
 
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