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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, I've got a 220 that I got at a flea market knowing next to nothing about planes for $5. I do know a thing or two about tools in general. I helped my father build our log cabin growing up, so there is that, but on to the plane.
It's got a busted mouth, like somebody pulled it with a winch or something, and flexed the back of the mouth out into the sole. I didn't think anything of it when I got it, but now that I've done some (okay, a lot :blush:) reading on this site, I know the sole has to be flat. Well, after finding the crack and breaking it off, and lapping the sole, and sharpening the iron, and squaring off the new mouth back, it looks presentable, even if the blade is unsupported. I don't have any scrap lumber to try it on, but it seemed to do alright on that door that's always sticking. :laughing: Couldn't get it to ribbon, but it made something approximating chips, so I think it could still be serviceable.
What do y'all think? Will this ever cut nice fluffy ribbons?
The wide-mouthed plane:
https://docs.google.com/a/vt.edu/file/d/0B7pSZhKIbJhpZllROXJweW1QSEE/edit
Overall view:
https://docs.google.com/a/vt.edu/file/d/0B7pSZhKIbJhpV2doZDJpMUdxdWc/edit
I looked it up, and I think it was made between 1907 and 1919 if I interpreted the chart right.

Acer
 

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Welcome!

Block planes do not immediately come to mind when contemplating light fluffy shavings. Is it possible, absolutely. Do block planes excel at making light fluffy shavings? In my opinion, no. Block planes really shine for smaller tasks -- trimming a nudge here, a nudge there, fixing this, fixing that, etc.

Regardless of your intended use, it needs to be sharp. Since it is so inexpensive and you don't have much invested, keep working on it and with it. However, as you becoke more familiar with hand tools, you will outgrow it.

Good Luck!

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Cool. That was kinda what I was thinking, but wanted to get a few other thoughts too. I'll keep looking for another base, but I'll likely get a chance to use it next week. I'll let y'all know how it works out.
I sanded the rust off with 150 grit yesterday, but it's already rusting up again. Is there anything I should coat the exposed metal with?
One other question, is it good to crank the adjustment wheel with the lever cap tight, or do I need to release it first?

Thanks,
Acer
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah, no central air, and here in SW VA, it's been real wet lately. I think I'll just wipe it down with a silicone cloth like I do my guns.

Acer
 

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Stop the presses!

DO NOT use silicone-impregnated rags, silicone-based auto wax or silicone sprays on woodworking tools. These can and will wreak havoc with finishes!

Paraffin (canning) wax, camellia or mineral oil, and non-silicone-containing waxes (S.C. Johnson's, Minwax, Renaissance, etc.) are fine alternatives.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Huh! Never would've guessed. Thanks! I'd hate to mess up a prefectly good japanning. Or did you mean wood finishes? Either way, won't be using the silicone. :eek:

Acer
 

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sorry for the ambiguity -- I refer to the transfer of the silicone from the tool to the wood being worked. It can result in blotchy stain absorption, fisheye in lacquer and other generally undesirable finish anomalies.
 

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The 220's are not "show" quality planes but are the standby of the working tradesman. They get the job done!
 
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