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Wood Snob
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to be edge banding a few miles of 3/4"X 1/2" walnut to 36 sheets of plywood cut down and made into 4 walk in closets. Lots of edges. My question to all my buddies...

Would you use a full size router or a trim router to flush up the wood? I bought a 3 fluted bit. Is this a good idea or not? With the veneer only a micro inch thick. It looks like I'm going to be in for a lot of work. I just don't normally work with plywood and never on this scale. So I'm probably not going to be using my hand tools.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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If your doing that much, I'd make a small jig to keep the trim router parallel to the wood and use that.
 

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Wood Snob
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
ryan50hrl said:
If your doing that much, I'd make a small jig to keep the trim router parallel to the wood and use that.
I was thinking the same. The wood is only wider than the plywood by an amount you can only feel. Trim router?

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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Wood Snob
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
mdntrdr said:
I would use a full size router with a jig/base to hold it correctly. :smile:
Can I buy a "jig"base without having to build it. Time is a big factor.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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Wood Snob
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My concern is mainly for making a cut in the plywood that requires me to pitch it and make another. If a smaller router will be better for staying on the level. I don't much care if it's life is shortened.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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John
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Hi Al - which router may depend on which bit you purchased. Most trim routers will only take 1/4" shank although my Trend also took 6 and 8mm shanks.
Your edge guide could serve as a jig. Most are cut out to where you can use them to flush cut. Adding a bearinged bit would just be some added insurance.
The edge guide could also be augmented to make for longer "legs" which would help stabilize the thing. Just add a couple of pieces of mdf or something to extend the edge guide further down the stock. Could be hot glued, double faced tape or even screwed on.:smile:
A decent trim router should handle something like that with no sweat. My Colt would be my weapon of choice for that job, very light and easy to handle with more than enough power.
 

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Wood Snob
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
jschaben said:
Hi Al - which router may depend on which bit you purchased. Most trim routers will only take 1/4" shank although my Trend also took 6 and 8mm shanks.
Your edge guide could serve as a jig. Most are cut out to where you can use them to flush cut. Adding a bearinged bit would just be some added insurance.
The edge guide could also be augmented to make for longer "legs" which would help stabilize the thing. Just add a couple of pieces of mdf or something to extend the edge guide further down the stock. Could be hot glued, double faced tape or even screwed on.:smile:
A decent trim router should handle something like that with no sweat. My Colt would be my weapon of choice for that job, very light and easy to handle with more than enough power.
Now your cookin with gas.

I posted in my first post I had in fact picked up a triple flute flush bit with a bearing. Tried making the cuts with my 690. Too big too heavy. I'm only trimming a micro inch so maybe I'll get the Colt. Do you like the fine adjust?

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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If you are using commercially available edge banding (the kind that comes in a roll), I would use a trimmer like woodsnthings suggested. I have a couple but the one I really like had a blade with a single bevel. I find I have better results with it.

If you are using thin solid stick for edge banding I would flush one side perfect when I glued it up so that I would only have to contend with one long side. Then use a flush trim with a bottom bearing bit in a small router. (I have a colt and love it for stuff like this). Build a jig for the base plate to keep it flat. Also with solid wood Depending on the tolerances of the band it my be possible to sand it flat as well

Good luck.
 

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I've got the Colt and it would be my tool of choice. You could attach an L-shaped plate to the bottom and do something like this:
 

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Wood Snob
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ttharp said:
If you are using commercially available edge banding (the kind that comes in a roll), I would use a trimmer like woodsnthings suggested. I have a couple but the one I really like had a blade with a single bevel. I find I have better results with it.

If you are using thin solid stick for edge banding I would flush one side perfect when I glued it up so that I would only have to contend with one long side. Then use a flush trim with a bottom bearing bit in a small router. (I have a colt and love it for stuff like this). Build a jig for the base plate to keep it flat. Also with solid wood Depending on the tolerances of the band it my be possible to sand it flat as well

Good luck.
The edge bands are 3/4" thick. I've got to use a router. Many of you are sporting the Colt. I picked it up in the box store. But was unsure the micro adjustments would be accurate or hit and miss. Sanding is out of the question. The veneer is just too thin to risk. And I've got miles of this stuff to lay.

I'm building 4 units. Two per walk in closet. They are all 8' high 2' deep and lengths are 13' 10' 11' and 8'. Those are just in the master suit. There are 4 more smaller closets and an pantry. All in walnut.

All the units are made to NOT look like California Closets. Sparing no expenses. No shelves with shelf pins. All the shelves have been determined and dadoed into place. Drawers and hampers. It's a great project and I almost never take on work for pay but they hated everything the closet companies wanted to sell them.

Thanks for your post. Tell me about your Colt.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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Wood Snob
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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Julie Mor said:
I've got the Colt and it would be my tool of choice. You could attach an L-shaped plate to the bottom and do something like this:
Julie
After I started this thread I started looking on the net. Saw the Fe$tool and thought it was a good idea too. Especially since their router is long and tall. I looked up the price and thought I could hire someone to build it for me cheaper. :) If I did a lot of this I might invest in one. Also if your hooking it up to their super vac. It would be hard to hold on line with anything less.

All these years in woodworking and I've only done a little edge banding. Now I'm up to my neck in it. Do you like the way the Colt micro adjusts? Thanks for your post. I like the way you think.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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Wood Snob
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Zircon said:
The few times I've done it, I just trimmed it with a block plane. Goes fast, it's quiet and you have control.
Yes I could do that too. I usually do as I don't own a trim router yet. And I am still using my cabinet scraper. But the pieces are 24" X 96". Sections 48" long. Miles of it. It's walnut and it's grain is wild on some of it. I don't have the time.

Thanks for your post
Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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You could clamp two panels together with a spacer between them then rout the edges with a flush trimming bit. You would want the panels to be set level of course but that way you would have an extra bearing surface for the base of the router to travel on. You could probably trim all four sides on the two pieces in one set up.
 
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