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I just finished getting my table I've been working on for the past 2 months totally sanded, and wiped down. Last night I went to stain it and I found that I had quite a few spots that just refused to take stain. Is this more than likely because of glue during the gluing process? I'll try to get some pictures up, but basically these problem areas are much lighter than the other areas that are taking the stain great.

Also, if they are indeed glue spots... how do I go about getting rid of them. Should I sand them down by hand after the fact and then re-apply the stain? Any tips?

Also some general staining tips are very appreciated. I've been watching some videos, but I'm sure some of you guys have some great tips from experience. Thanks!
 

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Been wondering this too, if you can just sand the glue off and stain
How easy it is to remove the glue residue depends on the wood, which is why Bill W. asked for the species.

Open pore woods like oak and ash will be difficult to sand - as in lots of sanding to get all clean wood.

If the project is to be stained, you need to be careful with the glue squeeze out. Wipe off with a wet sponge before it gets hard.

Also consider masking tape to prevent glue getting into surrounding areas.

Some folks say to use beeswax. This needs solvent to remove before staining.
 

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Not to hijack the OPs post but I glued up some red oak and thought I had all the glue wiped clean but was wrong. I've sanded it and looks like I've got it all but not sure since I haven't stained yet.

I was using TBIII. I love the stuff.
 

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It could be glue and it could also be wood putty if you used any. Anyway since you stained it I would wipe the table down with lacquer thinner to get as much of the linseed oil off as you can so it doesn't gum up the sandpaper as bad when you resand it. The best way to resand the table is with a random orbital sander if you have one. I would start over with the sanding and start with 80x paper and work your way up to at least 180 grit. If it is a soft wood like pine or alder I would go as far as 220 grit. Before you try stain again wipe the wood down with a solvent like mineral spirits or lacquer thinner and it will show the glue spots if you haven't sanded it enough again.
 

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To identify and highlight adhesive residue or surface contaminate wet a rag with mineral spirits and wipe all visible surfaces and joints. Any contaminates will show up. Then sand the surfaces to remove the contaminates and again check the surfaces with MS. Wiping with MS will also preview the way the finish will look when you apply the real finish.

This should be standard procedure before applying any finish.
 
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