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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am pretty new to the craft; just wondering what stain is best for birch plywood. And also why whitewashing/pickling is not good for birch. Thanks to all.
 

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A pickle finish is using a paint where the pigment sticks in the grain of the wood and details like moldings or carvings. Since birch is a closed grain wood there is no grain for the pigment to stick into. All of the flat areas between moldings would be without the character of the pickling. That is why the open grain oak is normally used for that finish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Steve, I was wondering why birch was not a good candidate for pickling. Do you have any suggestions for a stain on the darker side (preferably none with red hues) for birch? And what brand of pre-conditioner or toner do you suggest? Thanks again.
 

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Thanks Steve, I was wondering why birch was not a good candidate for pickling. Do you have any suggestions for a stain on the darker side (preferably none with red hues) for birch? And what brand of pre-conditioner or toner do you suggest? Thanks again.
if you do a lot of ply wood staining watch this video, with charles neil, i use this all the time when i am staining .
 

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Birch can be whitewashed/pickled, as well as Maple. Both are dense woods, but will take the coloring well. I start with a very weak mix done by ratios using cooking measuring spoons/cups. You can start with spoons in teaspoon sizes of an oil base paint in a mix of mineral spirits. Once you get a mix that works well, develop it into a larger portion...ounces per pint or quart.

The sample below was done with no conditioner/sealer, and the photo was with my phone.
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maple1.jpg








.
 

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I don't buy a prepackaged wood conditioner. I use linseed oil mixed 50/50 with mineral spirits and let it dry before staining. As far as stain you might use Wood Classics line of stain from Sherwin Williams, Ranch Oak SW3125 or Brazilnut SW3130 if you want a dark color without the red pigment. You could also use the Deep Penetrating Stain from Mohawk Finishing Products, Dark Walnut. Its an aniline dye so you can keep applying it until you get the color you wish but it needs to be sprayed.
 

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Chop,

That formula is basically a glue size, and they can work, the issue is the glue will soften under alot of stains and get gooey, we use a small amount of PVA , for a binder but the main ingrediant is 3 different acrylics , and some glycol ether. Just an FYI
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks to all who have written a response to my unknowing of staining and what it entails. I watched the video with Charles Neil and will most likely be purchasing some of the blotch control. It was pretty obvious that the product works and it is better than having to buy two different things (pre-conditioner and toner). However, I would really like to see the process of pickling/whitewashing on birch plywood specifically rather than the other stains used. Surely there is a video somewhere to show such. Lastly, I am in Moore, Oklahoma; where can I purchase the CN's Blotch Control around this area? Thanks again for every response, my knowledge is growing.
 

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Paul is correct, it is only available thru our web site. All the retailers want more markup than we can do, it would raise the cost by 5 to 6.00 a Qt, additionally they do not want to stock, so it would be a drop ship from us, meaning we would still have to package it and ship it, so shipping charges would still be there. So we just never saw the point.

We do have a 50/50 concentrate , where 1 qt makes 2, but the shipping on 1 qt doesn't save much over 2 qts, as they all have a 3 lb base charge . It does save on both product and shipping cost on 2 or more qts.

here is blog I did explaining more about pre-stains and using ours http://intheworkshop.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/applying-dyes-stains-over-my-blotch-control-prestain/

Also on each container is my email address and phone number, if you have questions . Just FYI
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Charles,

I ordered some of your blotch control yesterday. Super excited. Which is better to put on top of it; water based stain or oil based stain?

Thanks again,

Alex
 

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Water base works best, If you use oil you may only need 1 coat, as oil base has the oil which can cause too much of a seal with 2 coats of the blotch control, ALWAYS test on a scrap before commiting to the piece
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Charles,

On the instructions of your blotch control it says to let it set, wet, on the material for minutes. How many minutes to be sure to get a good saturation? Also, I'm going to attempt your glazing technique; after applying blotch control, water-based stain, and then water base polyurethane, sand lightly with 600grit sand paper, then re-apply stain and top coat. Is this the correct process to get an amazing finish? Thanks again for your time.

Sincerely,
Alex
 

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AlexVonSock said:
Thanks to all who have written a response to my unknowing of staining and what it entails. I watched the video with Charles Neil and will most likely be purchasing some of the blotch control. It was pretty obvious that the product works and it is better than having to buy two different things (pre-conditioner and toner). However, I would really like to see the process of pickling/whitewashing on birch plywood specifically rather than the other stains used. Surely there is a video somewhere to show such. Lastly, I am in Moore, Oklahoma; where can I purchase the CN's Blotch Control around this area? Thanks again for every response, my knowledge is growing.
I tried it on birch. It comes out on the pink side. I wanted white. So I didn't use the pickling. It looked great too.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

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Alex,

You pretty much got it, just apply the blotch control wet, wipe it off after 2 min or so, let dry then do a light scuff sand and apply a second coat, however if you are using a oil or gel stain be sure to test as often one coat is all you need with oil based stains, it depends entirely on the wood.

the glaze thing does really help to even and enrich the color, just as you have described, just be sure to let the glaze dry well, especially if used under a oil modified finish, such as General Finishes Endurovar or Minwax Oil modified urethane.

If I can help or you have questions my direct email is [email protected].
 

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Alex,

You pretty much got it, just apply the blotch control wet, wipe it off after 2 min or so, let dry then do a light scuff sand and apply a second coat, however if you are using a oil or gel stain be sure to test as often one coat is all you need with oil based stains, it depends entirely on the wood.

the glaze thing does really help to even and enrich the color, just as you have described, just be sure to let the glaze dry well, especially if used under a oil modified finish, such as General Finishes Endurovar or Minwax Oil modified urethane.

If I can help or you have questions my direct email is [email protected].
+1 on the waiting for the galze to dry completely prior to applying Endurovar. I allowed 4 hours for a waterbased glaze coat to dry and when I sprayed on the Endurovar the glaze reliquified and ran down the face of the wood....not pretty. Next time I'll allow 24 hours to make sure the glaze is good and dried out..
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
To all,

Just wanted to post a picture of the stained birch plywood table top. I picked a mixture of my two stains (yellowish whitewash, and coffee). I used all water based stains and an oil modified water-based polyurethane. The picture shows three coats of polyurethane sprayed on with an airbrush; however, the final product will probably have four to five coats. Thanks again for all the help, it turned out to be beautiful.



image-1485876389.jpg
 
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