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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Should I try to finish the Rails and Stiles before gluing them together?
I just stained the plywood panels and was wondering if it would be better to stain everything to avoid glues marks. :wacko:





 

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I stain and apply one coat of varnish to my panels then assemble the doors and then stain the rails and stiles. I apply one coat of varnish to the rails and stiles then apply the second coat of varnish to the entire door.
 

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Alan Sweet
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I apply one coat of stain before assembly.

I guess I'm not very agile when it come to staining assembled things.

I can only address the exposed end grain before assembly

I always get stain built up at edges or naked lines showing after assembly. Corners are a pain for me to. Molding for me requires special care especially if I have routed it; sometimes it needs extra sanding. So molding I stain before assembly also. It has its own edges issues and stain build up for me.

Since I am not the worlds greatest when it comes to gluing, I also find that some times that squeeze out can cause problems. The glue seals the wood and gives these little naked spots after staining. I can cut down on those if I stain before gluing.

I frequently route the external edge, to break the edge, or for decoration. This usually requires that I take extra care about staining before assembly.

Basically I have better success if I glue up after staining.

Raised panels must be stained before assembly.
 

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It's generally a bad idea to stain or finish the door frame before assembling it. The stain or finish will reduce or prevent the glue to bonding the joint. The wood needs to be porous for the glue to work and even the stain can make the wood less porous. It would be acceptable to stain or finish the panel if you wish. I for one have never had a door frame that went together perfect. I always have to sand the door after it is assemblied.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I’m exactly like Alan. I have such a hard time with corners and glue stains that I thought if I can’t get glue close to the edges with glue than I might as well stain it. I do plan on doing the panel like Gorge does, but I was just wondering about the frame as well.
I have a few more hours before the panels stain dries and then I was thinking about staining the frame. Perhaps then I could be done with it tomorrow, but my grandson wants to come over and build something so I guess I’ll be doing bird houses instead..:smile:
 

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I’m exactly like Alan. I have such a hard time with corners and glue stains that I thought if I can’t get glue close to the edges with glue than I might as well stain it. I do plan on doing the panel like Gorge does, but I was just wondering about the frame as well.
I have a few more hours before the panels stain dries and then I was thinking about staining the frame. Perhaps then I could be done with it tomorrow, but my grandson wants to come over and build something so I guess I’ll be doing bird houses instead..:smile:
It happens to all of us to have glue ooze out on the corners from time to time. When it happens if you wash it off with a wet rag you won't have a glue stain to contend with. I keep a bucket of water and a rag handy when ever I assemble anything using a PVA glue.
I normally stay back about 1/2" from the sticking when I apply the glue to the end of the rail to give it room to run without comming out. It also helps if you use a small artist paint brush to apply the glue so you don't apply too much to begin with.
 
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