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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have searched the forum but not find a simple solution. Perhaps that is a huge hint.

I generally use putty at the very end after staining and top coating. That does work but I would prefer to do it up front.

So I need a putty that will take an oil based stain and can be top coated with oil base poly.

What is the conventional wisdom on this?

Thanks.

Gary
 

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If you can come up with one that works.........you'll make millions. I'm convinced none of them work well enough to claim they match....
 

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If it is something small like nail holes, I use the flamable famowood putty first before a piece of furniture is sanded. It will usually stain the color of the wood. Sometimes it goes too dark and I have to touch up the color. If it is a big hole, I tint bondo the color of the finished color and use that. Using bondo you have to make the color a little less red to allow for the red hardener.

If I do any filling after the stain, I go ahead and apply the finish and use soft putty. I don't see any reason you couldn't use a water based putty after the first coat of finish as long as you didn't put on a big blob. It should sand with the finish.
 

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I have found that the stainable/paintable wood fillers are, in fact stainable and/or paintable. The problem is, wood has open pores that will absorb stains and paints, wood fillers have a non porous surface, so the stain absorbs differently into(or on) the surfaces.

You will get the same effect by sanding different parts of your project to different grits. A very good example is shown when staining end grain that has been sanded to the same grit (or lower) than the face grain. The end grain will absorb more stain and will be much darker. If you sand the end grain one or to grits higher, you close off more of the end grain pores so that it will not absorb as much stain.

You may be able to get a closer match by trying to rough up the wood filler surface so the stain has something to grab onto.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you can come up with one that works.........you'll make millions. I'm convinced none of them work well enough to claim they match....
I've had bad experiences as well which is why I am asking the question.

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If it is something small like nail holes, I use the flamable famowood putty first before a piece of furniture is sanded. It will usually stain the color of the wood. Sometimes it goes too dark and I have to touch up the color. If it is a big hole, I tint bondo the color of the finished color and use that. Using bondo you have to make the color a little less red to allow for the red hardener.

If I do any filling after the stain, I go ahead and apply the finish and use soft putty. I don't see any reason you couldn't use a water based putty after the first coat of finish as long as you didn't put on a big blob. It should sand with the finish.
Steve it is mainly simple nail hole filling that I am trying to find a solution for. I have not seen the Famowood product locally but I will buy some to try the next time I am shopping in the US.

Thanks.

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have found that the stainable/paintable wood fillers are, in fact stainable and/or paintable. The problem is, wood has open pores that will absorb stains and paints, wood fillers have a non porous surface, so the stain absorbs differently into(or on) the surfaces.

You will get the same effect by sanding different parts of your project to different grits. A very good example is shown when staining end grain that has been sanded to the same grit (or lower) than the face grain. The end grain will absorb more stain and will be much darker. If you sand the end grain one or to grits higher, you close off more of the end grain pores so that it will not absorb as much stain.

You may be able to get a closer match by trying to rough up the wood filler surface so the stain has something to grab onto.
MarkE, thank you for the feedback. I agree with your comments about color absorption but my issue is less that than wanting to do the nail hole filling earlier in the refinishing process.

Gary
 

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Cabinetman, I use MinWax colored putty and I put it in the nail holes after staining and top coating.

Gary
I haven't found (yet) a putty to be used on bare wood that can be stained with the wood and match. The after the finish fillers, like the crayon type pencils (Blend-Fil), can be used to get a very good match after the finish. Different colors can be mixed together, to make a fix almost invisible. The same type of fill putty comes in cans and small jars from many companies.

Another fix would be burn in shellac sticks. This repair can produce a very close color match, and is very durable.






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I use Timber mate wood filler [natural col] mix some in a bowl with stain or die to get right col. Works really well.
 

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I trim out houses, lots of nail holes to fill. I don't use any nails on cabinets and furniture that will show. Most I know in the business use a product called Color Putty, may be similar to Minwax, comes in a clear plastic jar. It's soft and two or more colors can be kneaded together for any color match if you don't like the stock colors. The work is stained, top coated and installed, putty placed in the holes, then the excess putty buffs off with a clean cloth. A final top coat is applied to the trim. It must be used in this way but it's very easy. Today, it's common to stain and apply one coat of varnish to the moldings before they are installed. This is much easier than having to do all that work after things are in place. No dirty finger marks to remove, no cutting in against walls, etc.

Any filler that is stainable has to be used before staining and top coating. Excess has to be sanded. You can't just sand that small area or it will show when the stain is applied, the whole piece has to be sanded for consistency. Very labor intensive. It also means, with house trim, that the moldings get installed in the raw. The edges of the filled nail holes accept stain differently than face grain and the filler. This makes the nail holes more pronounced, visually. There are a few that still do it this old fashioned way but the majority do it as I described above. Traditional fillers often get pushed out of the wood over time and stand proud of the surface. Wood will shrink and swell with humidity changes over the years. Doesn't seem to be a problem with the Color Putty.
 

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Steve it is mainly simple nail hole filling that I am trying to find a solution for. I have not seen the Famowood product locally but I will buy some to try the next time I am shopping in the US.

Thanks.

Gary
I can't get is locally anymore either. I started ordering it through the mail from Woodworkers Hardware. They are located in Sauk Rapids, Mn but I don't know if they ship to Canada.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I haven't found (yet) a putty to be used on bare wood that can be stained with the wood and match. The after the finish fillers, like the crayon type pencils (Blend-Fil), can be used to get a very good match after the finish. Different colors can be mixed together, to make a fix almost invisible. The same type of fill putty comes in cans and small jars from many companies.

Another fix would be burn in shellac sticks. This repair can produce a very close color match, and is very durable.










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Thanks Cabinetman. After the finish fillers are what I have been using. I have not yet tried burn in shellac sticks but I want to.

Gary
 
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