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Discussion Starter #1
I messed up.... Pretty big.... I bought four sheets of 3/4 oak ply to make my cabinet boxes out of.... Well I got in a hurry. I drew out all my pieces and cut them oversize with a circular saw free handed for easier handling .... Ouch. Well I ran them all threw my TS to final dimension and did not turn out how I wanted... For my long sides The side I put on my fence pretty much copied my bad cut to the opposite .... For the short ends I put on my incra miter gauge fence and crosscut and they did ok.... Is there any way to save these even if I have to adjust my cabinet depth.... The only way I can see this will affect anything is attaching my faceframes to the "not straight edge"... My backs will be in a dado so that shouldn't hurt too much.... Right??!! Is there a jig to square the long ends? Maybe a home made crosscut sled... Or should I just make some nice firewood and start over.....
Sorry for the confusion any ideas would help greatly....
 

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Woodnthings has a simple straight line rip jig in this thread.

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/straight-line-rip-jig-40532/

For the plywood, you could simply tape a straight piece of lumber to the side of the plywood. Needs to be as long or longer than the plywood.

You would also hand plane one edge straight - if you have a decent hand plane.

If you do not want to change the cabinet design, consider adding solid oak edge pieces. Not difficult to make or attach and actually may look better than seeing the edge of the plywood.
 

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where's my table saw?
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table saw lesson

"curved face in , curved side out" The side against the fence must be straight it will wil duplicate the same curve on the cut side. It may be slightly less curved, but still not straight.

So what to do now?
The jig posted above is one easy way, but you'd have to make the jig. Another way is to use a long straight piece between the curve and the fence to "act" like that side is straight. Like this steel barn door track:
You must move the work and the "track" simultaneously together and keep them both pressed in toward the fence.
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/door-build-2-xs-1-4-ply-55717/
OR you could also attach a piece to stock with a few brad nails to register against the fence which would do the same thing.
OR you can use just a straight edge guide and a circular saw and work to a line or dimension marked on the workpiece. Then once one side is straight, recut them on the tablesaw.
 

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I had a couple of cabinet sides that were uneven in length. I matched up one end, then set up a guide and cross cut both pieces at the same time.
 

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If you're sizing with a handheld saw, use the factory edge against the tablesaw fence. You might first run a block sander over the edge one pass to remove any debris.

Sizing panels can also ber done by using the size you want, and cut an oversized piece. Lay the oversized piece on the sized piece, clamp and run a flush trim router long the edges.






.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Woodnthings I think that maybe what I choose due to I would b able to take very light passes off and not mess with my dimensions too awful bad.... All these are great tips guys and Hopfully I have learned from this time costly mistake
 

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where's my table saw?
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I don't know your skill level...

But let's assume it's beginner by the question. DO NOT attempt what I did. :no: I have a splitter on the saw that will prevent the work from rotating off the fence resulting in a kickback. I also have some years of experience with the saw, including kickbacks. My splitter stays on the table saw permanently.

You should use an attached straight piece on the fence side of the work. Just tack the straight piece on the top of the plywood with some brad nails. Make the pass and then remove the attached board. Then make the opposite side pass and you will have 2 parallel sides.

The ends may not be square to the sides, however. Squaring all 4 sides of a panel in not an easy process without a large table saw and either a sled or at least one square corner to start with.
Here's what I use with a circular saw:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/4-x-8-panel-cross-cuts-10476/
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My ends Are ok.... I uses my incra crosscut miter gauge to cut these and did not have same problem.... I also have splitter and anti-kickback paws and guard.... I still think I will attach a board
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I just made a couple ripping jigs... I took a oak 2" runner and screwed it to a wide piece of birch ply and ran my saw along the runner cutting the ply to the exact width.... I made a 2' 3' 4' and 8'....
 

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Grizzly makes a really nice track saw for $245.00 I tried to follow my own straight edges by hand and screwed up some plywood cuts in the past as well. After getting the track saw all my cuts where really great it has been a game changer in my shop. It's not as nice as the dewalt or festool brands but it still does an awesome job especially for the price
 
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