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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a bunch of old true 4x6 heart pine beams that I was thinking of splitting to make a table. I would typically approach this and split them into 2" boards using my table saw (contractor size) with the blade all the way up, BUT I'm thinking perhaps this is not the best way to go. Does anyone have any safer/smarter suggestions to doing something like this without a band saw?
 

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where's my table saw?
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Nope

You're on the same page as I would be with the table saw. You can register off the same fence and flip them end for end to get the kerf the same distance from the fence. Then if necessary, hand saw through the remaining material to break the slab free. :yes:

A full depth cut may strain the motor, but if you use a 24 Tooth rip blade, with a thin kerf, you will minimize the power required. If you have to buy that blade for the project, you will still use it for many other rips in the future.... I know, I have this one:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Diablo-1...cular-Saw-Blade-D1024X/100070768#.UjBvq389gVc
 
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The table saw should be safe - assuming the boards do not have any internal stress which will cause the board to close on the blade. You will not see this on the first pass, only on the second. Been there, had this happen.

Set the blade to be a tad higher than middle of the board rather than maximum height. It is common the two cuts will not meet exactly, at least on some part of the board, so minimize the overlap.

I have tried this with circular saw and fence, before I purchased a table saw. This was a 4x4 so the circular saw blade was deep enough.

For the 6in thick board, I would use your table saw.

A band saw would be easier, but you stated that is not an option.
 

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Without a bandsaw....the tablesaw method is your only option. I've done it before, but be careful as it is dangerous.
 

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where's my table saw?
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possibly

Without a bandsaw....the tablesaw method is your only option. I've done it before, but be careful as it is dangerous.
The best/safest results will be if you have a square corner on your plank to register to the fence and to the table. Any twist in the plank will bind the blade.
Bandsaws don't care much if there's a slight twist in the work piece, that an other reasons, is why it's the "best' method.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great, thanks guys!

I had tried splitting a 3.5" piece of 8/4 walnut before and that closed up on my blade so I couldn't push and further. I thought that may be a common problem, but maybe it was just a bad piece of wood. I made my newel posts for my stairs with old beams this way, but they weren't as tall so it wasn't too much trouble. I just thought someone might have some trick or a better way of doing it.

I'll definitely look to get that better blade. I have an 80tooth one I used for my cabinet build and then the one I have on there now is a 24tooth but just a cheap Irwin that I think I've had on there since I got it and definitely not thin. And I'll need to make sure the corner is squared. It's pretty rough lumber so there probably would be a good chance of trouble if I ran it on the fence as it is now.

Thanks again for all the advice!
 

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woodnthings said:
The best/safest results will be if you have a square corner on your plank to register to the fence and to the table. Any twist in the plank will bind the blade.
Bandsaws don't care much if there's a slight twist in the work piece, that an other reasons, is why it's the "best' method.
That's what I was thinking. I'd joint one 6" face flat first, then resaw off of that face. That and a riving knife should eliminate binding.
 

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One more thought, I'm not sure how powerful your TS is, but I've had my 1.75hp motor trip the internal breaker making big cuts before. If your TS is bogging down, you can make multiple passes raising the blade each pass and then flip the board and do it again.

To prevent the blade from binding, once you resaw from one side of the board, add a spacer to the kerf to prevent the board from closing up around the blade.
 

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Great, thanks guys!

I had tried splitting a 3.5" piece of 8/4 walnut before and that closed up on my blade so I couldn't push and further. I thought that may be a common problem, but maybe it was just a bad piece of wood. I made my newel posts for my stairs with old beams this way, but they weren't as tall so it wasn't too much trouble. I just thought someone might have some trick or a better way of doing it.

I'll definitely look to get that better blade. I have an 80tooth one I used for my cabinet build and then the one I have on there now is a 24tooth but just a cheap Irwin that I think I've had on there since I got it and definitely not thin. And I'll need to make sure the corner is squared. It's pretty rough lumber so there probably would be a good chance of trouble if I ran it on the fence as it is now.

Thanks again for all the advice!
Go to Home Depot and buy a 24T Freud Diablo blade. Should be $30 or so and it does very well. Make at least 2 passes on each side, and I would probably make 3 passes each side myself. Keep the same side of the beam against the fence for all cuts rather than switching to the opposite face.

Leave maybe 1/4" or 1/8" in the center and cut through the rest with a handsaw. It won't take very long or be a ton of work since it's thin, but it's much safer. I split 6/4 wood like this a few times.
 

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where's my table saw?
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echo...echo...

I guess you didn't read my post, no. 2

At least we gave exactly the same advice. :yes:
 

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I've got a 14" Delta bandsaw that I believe could handle a 6" resaw. How long are the boards?

I also have a 6" jointer which would give you the flat face and square edge you'd need. I would at least take me up on this offer before running it through the tablesaw.

I'd gladly burnout a bandsaw blade and donate my time if it means keeping you from experiencing a nasty kickback scenario. Just let me know if you're interested. You've got my number and I think we will be in town the next few weekends.

Sean
 

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I've got a 14" Delta bandsaw that I believe could handle a 6" resaw. How long are the boards?
I'd gladly burnout a bandsaw blade and donate my time if it means keeping you from experiencing a nasty kickback scenario.
Sean
Just curious, why you think it would burn out a blade?
 

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I've got a 14" Delta bandsaw that I believe could handle a 6" resaw. How long are the boards?

I also have a 6" jointer which would give you the flat face and square edge you'd need. I would at least take me up on this offer before running it through the tablesaw.

I'd gladly burnout a bandsaw blade and donate my time if it means keeping you from experiencing a nasty kickback scenario. Just let me know if you're interested. You've got my number and I think we will be in town the next few weekends.

Sean

Good on you Sean:thumbsup: Wish I had a neighbor like you.
 

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Just curious, why you think it would burn out a blade?
I've worked with heart pine (from this area) before and the inside of those beams can gum up a blade fairly quick. Not to mention I don't have the the most finely tuned bandsaw. I'm not saying it will burn up a blade, but I'd be more than willing to find out!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've got a 14" Delta bandsaw that I believe could handle a 6" resaw. How long are the boards?

I also have a 6" jointer which would give you the flat face and square edge you'd need. I would at least take me up on this offer before running it through the tablesaw.

I'd gladly burnout a bandsaw blade and donate my time if it means keeping you from experiencing a nasty kickback scenario. Just let me know if you're interested. You've got my number and I think we will be in town the next few weekends.

Sean
Awesome, thanks for the offer!
 

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Without a bandsaw....the tablesaw method is your only option. I've done it before, but be careful as it is dangerous.
I always looking at safety. Just wondering what is dangerous. Using a table saw to resaw what safety tips could you give me ? I use a band saw for most of my resawing but its just easier sometimes just to use the table saw. :eek:
 

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ripping or resawing dangerous?

I always looking at safety. Just wondering what is dangerous. Using a table saw to resaw what safety tips could you give me ? I use a band saw for most of my resawing but its just easier sometimes just to use the table saw. :eek:
Yep, but so is almost every cut on a table saw or other power tool.
If I were to resaw a 4" x 6" on the table saw I would set the blade at 2/3 maximum height or less then half the thickness. Make certain there is a square corner and a flat surface on 3 faces. Then make the rip cut using the fence, flip the board end for end, and make the second rip leaving a thin seam in the center. I would then hand saw the center away to separate the 2 pieces. This is slightly safer than cutting all the through and having the pieces separated by the table saw blade. The cut off piece may be heavy and awkward to control if separated.

One issue with a table saw is the kerf may close inside the rip and pinch the blade causing to bind and overheat. This will cause you to use more force to make the pass, rather than allowing the blade to cut on it's own rate. If the wood is prone to closing a bandsaw will be much safer. Making multiple passes will also help.

If the faces aren't square and parallel the board will twist or bind during the rip and may kickback at you. That's why my tag line reads.....
 

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One More Time

Yep, but so is almost every cut on a table saw or other power tool.
If I were to resaw a 4" x 6" on the table saw I would set the blade at 2/3 maximum height or less then half the thickness. Make certain there is a square corner and a flat surface on 3 faces. Then make the rip cut using the fence, flip the board end for end, and make the second rip leaving a thin seam in the center. I would then hand saw the center away to separate the 2 pieces. This is slightly safer than cutting all the through and having the pieces separated by the table saw blade. The cut off piece may be heavy and awkward to control if separated.
See post#10

One issue with a table saw is the kerf may close inside the rip and pinch the blade causing to bind and overheat. This will cause you to use more force to make the pass, rather than allowing the blade to cut on it's own rate. If the wood is prone to closing a bandsaw will be much safer. Making multiple passes will also help.

If the faces aren't square and parallel the board will twist or bind during the rip and may kickback at you. That's why my tag line reads.....
See post #8 (good advice).:yes:






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