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I received a "lathe spindle tap" from the Beall Tool Co. for Christmas. I've watched a couple of videos on this tool and it seems like it would be a very useful tool.

I've looked around on this forum and have not seen anybody using or mentioning this tool.
Does anybody have any experience with this tool?

Thank you
Dick
 

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I bought one. I seldom use it but I will now. I just started doing metal spinning and the best way to make the forms is to drill and tap the form. I don't see much use for it on regular woodturning because they are bettter ways to attach wood to the lathe. Most of the methods use less wood so there is less waste when your trying to get as much out of the wood as you can.
I do use a 3/4 by 10 tap for making custom live center adaptors for my live center. Those are really handy. There are other ways to do it beside using a tap however. I often just glue a 3/4x10 nut in a block of wood and then turn it so fit the use I have.
 

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I have one. I have used it to make small faceplates. I use the faceplates for drink coasters and the like. I also have the 3/4 X 10 tap for making various things for the live center.

For me it is one of those things that may not be used often, but, it can be a lifesaver.
 

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I have one and use it to make wood faceplates and attachments for home made vacuum chucks. Handy to have available when you need it.

If you do not have a scroll chuck, you can use the Beall tool to make threaded jam chucks.

I have a separate tap and die set I use to make 3/4in x 10 tpi adapters for the live centre.
 

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I have a couple of them (since my new lathe has a different spindle diameter than the first one I had).

I use them to make jam chucks for turning balls and "friction drives" for reversing bowls so I can finish the foot. I have several different sizes, and this means I don't have to keep moving my faceplate from one to another (and consequently don't have to re-true everything each time I use them.)

Also I've made wooden cones that hold buffing wheels to do the "Beall system" (tripoli/white diamond/carnauba wax). They are nothing fancy -- about 8" spindles drilled through to take a bolt and washer so I can fix the buffing wheel on one end, the other end drilled and tapped to fit the drive shaft. I like the distance it puts between the wheel and the headstock, and since there's no tailstock I can work down inside a bowl as well.
 

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Same here. I find it very useful for jam chucks/friction chucks and vacuum chucks. I use Glued up pine scraps and saturate the threads with thin CA to harden them.
 

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The Beall Taps seem very useful, but I'm wondering how you would ensure that the thread is dead perpendicular to the surface of whatever you're tapping. Any tips?
 

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The Beall Taps seem very useful, but I'm wondering how you would ensure that the thread is dead perpendicular to the surface of whatever you're tapping. Any tips?
1) Drill the hole on the lathe, this guarantees it's axial (but only guarantees it's perpendicular to the front face if you true the face first)

2) Tap the hole on the lathe. Use a live center in the tailstock, tip of the cone resting in the dimple in the tail of the tap. There's no way it can be anything but true.

(And as you turn the tap into the hole, crank the quill of the tailstock at the same rate so it maintains a gentle forwards pressure.)
 
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