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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

Althought I apprenticed in an old fashioned cabnet makers shop 35 years ago, I consider myself a novice at fine woodworking. I am making a few simple cutting boards for the holidays and have a question about sanding.

I do not have a spindle sander (yet) and after cutting my boards with a nice fine cut blade it seems they are pretty smooth to the touch. Not having the spindle, i got drums for my drill press, but even with the 120 grain, they come off feeling rougher than when they went on.

Should I forget the drill press route?

If the boards feel. Very smooth, do I really need to sand themm further before glueing?

Finally, for an economical spindle, I am considering the Rigid sold at home depot to get me started. Any comments on that unit?

Thank you very much!

Doug
 

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Not sure what kind of glue up you are doing, but I don't see how a spindle sander would benefit you. I would avoid any sanding of the edges or faces you plan on gluing altogether.
 

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Let's back up a bit. What kind of saw did you use with the fine tooth blade? I'm guessing you are building edge grain cutting boards and you have ripped the boards in preparation for edge gluing?

If so, there would be no reason to use a spindle sander at all. In fact, it could be detrimental to a flat, smooth surface. The best bet would be to run the pieces through a jointer or rip them with a glue-line rip blade.

More information??

Bill
 

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as suggested avoid the sanders

Oscillating or drum sanders are for curved stock, not for straight edges that will be glued together. Usually a good 40 tooth blade will lease a smooth enough surface for gluing. Avoid stopping the cut midstream as it will leave a divot in the cut. Keep the board moving smoothly until you make the entire pass.

If you really want to sand your boards after planing or sawing use a stationary drum sander like this one:
http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-Baby-Drum-Sander-Polar-Bear-Series/G0459P

I have one and it puts an very nice surface on the boards, but it won't take a very deep pass, just a 1/64" or so at a time. :yes:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
80 tooth blase

Bill,

I used an 80 tooth fine blade. I did get good true cuts and the boards line up with no gaps at all.

Thank you for the reply. You confirmed what I thought. I remember a lot from those wonderful days in the shop, but am never 100% sure I am on target.

Regards,

Doug
 

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Do you have a planer? I sometimes get burnt marks when cutting hard maple. I will set them on edge and run thru the planner to achieve my final gluing surface.
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Planer

Yes, I have a planer and planned on using it because of the ever so slight variation in the lumber depth. It is close, but when laid on a flat surface, clear that there are very slight differences.
 

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For a spindle sander, the Harbor Freight model is only about $89 when it is on sale or advertised in some magazines like Wood magazine. It works good enough for me in a hobby type atmosphere.
Mike
 
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