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I made this one yesterday after coming home from work. It's a piece of spalted maple that turned out some pretty wild grain. I had to put a coat of lacquer inside and out to make a final cut on each. It did the trick and prevented tearout on the endgrain areas. It measures 7 1/2" x 3".
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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This Space For Rent
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Beautiful wood and bowl. That looks like some of the wood I've had. Same problem with tearout, now I now how to deal with it.
 

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That's a great looking bowl and a great tip. I haven't heard that before but will be trying it soon. It almost looks like an old map with the spalt patterns. Cool stuff.
 

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Damn, that's pretty. Pictures sure make it seem bigger than it is... even my little Jet could swing that. Final product wouldn't come out so nice but maybe someday I'll have that kind of skill. Maybe someday.
 

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outstanding!!!!!!! how rare is spalted maple, only cause i have been turning for years and have't come across any, where do you find it, local mill or woodcraft or such?????
 

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Discussion Starter #13
outstanding!!!!!!! how rare is spalted maple, only cause i have been turning for years and have't come across any, where do you find it, local mill or woodcraft or such?????
BD,
spalted wood is somewhat common in our area. It is a process that starts when the wood is left wet and is in the earliest stages of starting to rot. Supposedly you can start the process yourself on a cut log by leaving it outside where it can get wet and stay damp, and standing it up on end so the cut edge is in contact with the ground. This piece of wood actually came from one of the members in our turning club. He was cleaning out his shop and brougt a whole van load of blanks that were dry. He sold them at pretty cheap prices and the wood was gone in about ten minutes.
Mike Hawkins;)
 

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That is one beautiful bowl. I have a few bowls that are roughed out and did not burn in my shop so when my new shop is done I will finish some of them. That's some very nice work.
Donny
 

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BD,
spalted wood is somewhat common in our area. It is a process that starts when the wood is left wet and is in the earliest stages of starting to rot. Supposedly you can start the process yourself on a cut log by leaving it outside where it can get wet and stay damp, and standing it up on end so the cut edge is in contact with the ground. This piece of wood actually came from one of the members in our turning club. He was cleaning out his shop and brougt a whole van load of blanks that were dry. He sold them at pretty cheap prices and the wood was gone in about ten minutes.
Mike Hawkins;)
thanks mike, i am always wanting to know how nature provides us with different types of beautiful lumber. now can that be done with any type of log or is it only certain types of species of wood. about how long does that take. I have some red maple, well a burl i am going to take but i have to drop the whole tree, its a big tree. so i would like to experiment a little, just don't want it to take 5 years to do it?????
 

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Saw Miller Australia
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The spalting sure gives it character,really nice work there Mike.Everything you turn comes out a treat,may i say you are very gifted:yes:.Cheers Chris
 
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