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I've been experimenting with turning pepper mills using CrushGrind mechanisms. After some incredibly valuable input from Syd Sellers and Dave Paine, I dove in. One of the things I like about the crush grind mechanism is that the shaft length is easily adjusted so I can make the mill whatever size I want. As a new turner, making something come out to an exact length can be somewhat uncertain :) I also like that there's no adjustment knob at the top, affording more options to make the top unusual shapes. One of the things I discovered along the way is that if you can get the slot that the mechanism snaps into in exactly the right location, installation is a snap (pun intended). After lots of shopping, I bought the Sorby tool mostly because of the cost, but using it couldn't be any easier. The notch in the tool guides the slot for the lower part. That notch rides right on the ledge of the recess and you just nudge the cutter in to cut the slot. The line that's midway up lines up for the part that goes in the knob. With this tool in hand, building with the CrushGrind mill is much less intimidating. A 1-1/2" hole for the grinder part and a 7/8" hole for the top part and the parts press fit and the tabs snap into the slots which are perfectly placed by using the special tool.

http://www.hartvilletool.com/product/5988/scrapers
 

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Glad to read that you are making pepper mills and enjoying the process.

I am not sure if Sorby is the only tool. Not cheap, but happy it this is working out for you. :thumbsup:

Sometimes the smaller purchases can make a big improvement to enjoying the hobby.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Glad to read that you are making pepper mills and enjoying the process.

I am not sure if Sorby is the only tool. Not cheap, but happy it this is working out for you. :thumbsup:

Sometimes the smaller purchases can make a big improvement to enjoying the hobby.
Dave, you're correct. The Sorby isn't the only tool, but best I can tell, it's the least costly. Even so, the way it's made makes it super easy to use.
 
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