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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I SUCK at 'finishing'... Still got a lot to learn and a long way to go. :yes:


Fortunately, I got 'help' when it comes to the 'finish' coats and can get helped with advice along the way to getting my stuff 'ready' for the final coat to be applied... :thumbsup:


This is some stuff Jerry did for me recently:





The 'feet' he did for this project above:


Another project he helped me with today:





I 'thought' he was done with this latest project and went to the paintroom to get it and it was not there... Jerry had it in his office and was wetsanding the thing! LOL! :blink: Said he was wanting to make it 'perfect'! LOL! :smile:


I did the colors myself and did the lacquer 'buildup' on my pieces. Jerry did the 'finish coats' for me... (I now OWE him) :yes:

Jerry runs our paintroom and only does finishes when he 'feels' like it or someone else 'needs' help... This guy charges more for just ONE of his painting classes than I can make in several days... He ALWAYS books the entire class with ease when he decides to hold one... :yes:

In the past - This guy ran several different large auto body shop paint departments locally and has done a metric boatload of custom work over the years including boats, bikes, high end furniture / conference tables, etc... Jerry has 'forgot' more stuff about paint than I will ever learn... :yes:



He does NOT keep or use 'chinese' tools in his paintroom... :no:

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
"Jerry" might prefer an Italian spray gun, but he sure doesn't keep it very clean.:thumbdown:

The stuff outside does NOT affect the spray pattern...

It is the inside that matters... :yes:


You can't get the same atomization from your 'china' gun no matter how clean the outside (or inside) is... :no:


China tries to 'copy' what others have 'perfected'... :yes:

LOL! :smile:
 

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One thing I might caution you on. Lacquer is a really hard finish. It is more brittle than a lot of finishes. If you use it that thick when it starts to get a little old it is likely to get cracks in it. It would be better if you were going to use a finish that thick you used a urethane.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
One thing I might caution you on. Lacquer is a really hard finish. It is more brittle than a lot of finishes. If you use it that thick when it starts to get a little old it is likely to get cracks in it. It would be better if you were going to use a finish that thick you used a urethane.

Great advice. :thumbsup:

The lacquer DID chip a small bit on the underside when installing the fasteners for the feet on the one project... It was covered up by the feet but still...

I have added flex agent in the past when doing parts that I KNEW were going to be moving around / getting bent on poly based finishes but have NOT as yet tried any of those sort of finishes on 'wood' stuff.

I mostly sprayed that stuff on plastic / fiberglass vehicle parts.

Do you have a personal preference for urethane finishes on wood?

Appreciate your thoughts on the matter... :thumbsup:
 

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Lacquer is perfect for multi layer coats. Nitrocellulose lacquer that is. Modern Post or Pre catalyzed lacquers most certainly have thickness limits. Usually about 5 mil dry.
 

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Great advice. :thumbsup:

The lacquer DID chip a small bit on the underside when installing the fasteners for the feet on the one project... It was covered up by the feet but still...

I have added flex agent in the past when doing parts that I KNEW were going to be moving around / getting bent on poly based finishes but have NOT as yet tried any of those sort of finishes on 'wood' stuff.

I mostly sprayed that stuff on plastic / fiberglass vehicle parts.

Do you have a personal preference for urethane finishes on wood?

Appreciate your thoughts on the matter... :thumbsup:
I'm not real picky on brand of urethane. I use what I can get locally which is Arm-R-Seal. The lacquer in the picture is more than 30 years old but I think it's been cracked like that for about 20 years. I finished a top for a table before I got into using pastewood grain fillers and tried to fill the grain with the lacquer so it got kinda thick. I believe it was done with Gemini L-93-3 lacquer. I know it wasn't a catalyzed lacquer.
 

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I would disagree with the dirty gun on outside not affecting the spray pattern. It very well can. If there's enough dirt in the right or in this case wrong place.
 

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If that's a dirty sprayer than I guess I'm in big trouble. :laughing: I have better things to do than wash sprayers. I just keep the nozzle and innards clean.
When clients see shops, what they see may be an indicator of the type of work done. I seriously doubt that if they saw a clean shop, and clean tools, that you had nothing going on.







.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Lacquer is perfect for multi layer coats. Nitrocellulose lacquer that is. Modern Post or Pre catalyzed lacquers most certainly have thickness limits. Usually about 5 mil dry.
That is exactly what I used for the initial coats.

Was topcoated with a conversion varnish.



:yes:

Thanks for the input here. :thumbsup:
 

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Bad move. You should never put a harder coating on top of a softer coating. The conversion varnish will crush the nitro.
 

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As conversion varnish cures it shrinks. As it shrinks it will crush the coating below it. It might take 6 months for this to happen. Usually the CV will be so "hot" that it will destroy the finish on contact.
 
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