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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going to be building an entertainment center for my apartment soon. The finish I am going for is a more "golden brown" look without any shine to it. Would I need fine to add just the stain? Or would that fade without a coat of wax or varnish?
 

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Yes, you must overcoat most any stain to protect the surface and to make a more durable surface. A pigment stain will contain only a small amount of a resin which is intended to hold the pigment on the surface until it can be over-coated.

What time of stain are you thinking of using? There are lots of choices depending on what "look" you want and what coloring you want. What species of wood will you be using?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am thinking of using Minwax Golden Pecan stain from Lowes, it has the colour I want. I'll probably use pine (unless I can get oak for the right price)
 

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Old School
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I am thinking of using Minwax Golden Pecan stain from Lowes, it has the colour I want. I'll probably use pine (unless I can get oak for the right price)
Pine and Oak are very different. Your choice in stain color should depend on what it looks like on whichever wood species you pick, not what it looks like on a color chart. And, you should plan your whole finishing schedule, because your stained wood sample will look different once the topcoat is applied.






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Rick Mosher
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Number one and most important, make samples on scrap wood of the species you are using until you are happy with the look.

After you apply your stain you need at least one seal coat. It could be very thin but you should seal the stain.

Next if you want no shine you buy your finish in Flat or Dead Flat sheen, thin it down some and apply only one coat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Pine and Oak are very different. Your choice in stain color should depend on what it looks like on whichever wood species you pick, not what it looks like on a color chart. And, you should plan your whole finishing schedule, because your stained wood sample will look different once the topcoat is applied.






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I intend to set aside a week to do this in the spring, so trying to plan a budget now. I know oak is very different and will take differently with stains. I already know to test it on scrap. (I have a LITTLE experience with wood work)
 
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