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Hi All...
Has anyone out there installed a solid surface counter top??
I have been hired to install one in a bathroom this Friday, and I have
another coming up in a week. I have over thirty years experience in cabinet making and fine woodwork, but never done one of these. I figure it's about time.
Any tips would be appreciated.
The back splashes are separate pieces.. how are they attached? Silicone? Bubble Gum?

Is Silicone adequate for holding the top to the cabinet?

Any tips for machining edges to get a good fit?

Thanks Y'all
Scott :no:
 

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I've got an Uncle that is certified in Corian but personally I've never worked with the stuff. I've heard it works just like wood. A belt sander to scribe the edges and a router will cut any profile on the edges but they will have to be buffed out to match the surface sheen. Seaming is the tricky part but if you don't have a seam I would think it would be a cinch. Silicone will stick the top and backspashes. Also use it for caulking in the corners.

I've always wanted to go spend a week working for my Uncle but he's about 4 hours from me and I've never had the time. He said he would teach me.

Remember the information given above is from a non-professional as far as solid surfacing goes. Don't blame me for anything that goes wrong.
 

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i've seamed and installed theses tops for many years (corian) and silicone is more than suitable as an adhesive to hold it down and for mounting the splashes
 

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corien is simple, it's one piece and no cutting required it's simple as glueing or siliconing as mentioned earlier, and it cuts with a skillsaw, jigsaw or router as normal, seaming and splicing is also forgiving with the right match of corien seam fillers, u can use wood blocks to hot glue to the top on both sides of a seam and fill together pulling clamps tight to set and then buff out denautred alchol works well even if you F up you can add on if you have scrap to say if you cut to short or how have you can be screwed underneith as well to substrates
 

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corien is simple, it's one piece and no cutting required it's simple as glueing or siliconing as mentioned earlier, and it cuts with a skillsaw, jigsaw or router as normal, seaming and splicing is also forgiving with the right match of corien seam fillers, u can use wood blocks to hot glue to the top on both sides of a seam and fill together pulling clamps tight to set and then buff out denautred alchol works well even if you F up you can add on if you have scrap to say if you cut to short or how have you can be screwed underneith as well to substrates



It's likely that the OP has figured out the installation as this thread is 5 years old. But to add my couple of pennies, I prefer to use Polyseamseal to mount solid surface tops to cabinets. I find it's easier to use and provides a much cleaner install for caulking than silicone. Not as messy either and cleans up better.








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