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Discussion Starter #1
I am in the process of building some dining room chairs. Since this is my first time building chairs so I want to use a glue with a long open time and option to redo. I have hide glue pellets and was planning to use them. Directions say keep the glue at 145*. How critical is the 145? I have a cooker with a thermostat that goes on and off within some adjustable temperature range. If I maintain the temp between say 140 and 150 will I be okay? Or is 145 the drop dead critical temp for hide glue?


Thanks,
Don
 

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Hide Glue

Hot hide glue does not have a long open time. Urea can be added to it to obtain slower adhesion times. I do not know the ratio because I have never used it that way.
As to temp. I have held it in the 140-150d range with no problems.
If I need a long open time I buy liquid hide glue already made up in the bottle. I think it is Tightbond.
This has served me well over the years and is stronger than the wood.
 

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Your temp range is pro`bly ok... the cooler the glue gets, the thicker it gets (and sets up faster), warmer and it`ll be thinner but i don`t what temp is too hot (I have a glue pot made for the stuff),and might damage the glue. I use urea (15 grams in 180 grams of water for 100 grams of glue )to give me about 5-10 minutes of working time (with medium (180)glue).Heating the parts (important in winter for me) helps.
 

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I would strongly suggest you use slow set two part epoxy for assembling your chairs. It is very forgiving and will provide a secure joint even if the joint is not perfect. A collapsing chair is something that is very dangerous and many are hurt. I would not use hide glue unless you are very experienced with its use. Epoxy was the only adhesive we would use in our shop for repair of chairs or for new chairs. We made probably over 400-500 chairs and know of no failures.

BTW, joints made with epoxy adhesive are easily opened if necessary for repair. Heating with a heat gun or an infrared heat lamp will soften the epoxy allowing the joint to be opened.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you both for that valuable input. I knew the Franklin pre mix had a long open time and assumed the mix yourself also did.

Avoided a real mess there.

Thanks,
Don
 

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Discussion Starter #6
BTW, joints made with epoxy adhesive are easily opened if necessary for repair. Heating with a heat gun or an infrared heat lamp will soften the epoxy allowing the joint to be opened.

Howie,

That is great information. I thought epoxy was "forever". Had no idea it could be undone. Is the heat required to disassemble a joint high enough that the finish (say lacquer) would be damaged?

Don
 

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DonG, depends upon how long it's been cured and a few other factors, but often you can do it with a high wattage light bulb as your heat source, if you enclose the piece well enough with the lamp.
 
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