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Windstorm I think you have done a great job. Never be reluctant to show your work. At least on this web site. We are a like minded group of woodworkers yet we are all on a different skill levels. We all share idea's and learn from each other. Keep up the great work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Thanks, Handyman. That's what I like so much about this forum. There's no such thing as a stupid question & everyone is so helpful. Example: I never cut a box joint with a router until last week & thanks to advice I received on this site, I managed to do it right & build something I'm pretty proud of. For me, woodworking is pure therapy & I appreciate the cooperative spirit I get at WoodworkingTalk.com. Listen to me, I sound like a tv commercial. Seriously, though, it's been a real joy going online & talking with other like-minded wood nuts like myself.

Terry
 

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Nice shop. About three times the size of my little shop. I've got a small 12x20 shop with everything on wheels to roll out of the way and an old shop smith for a table saw and drill press. Larger projects are a problem, but I've got too many other things on the burner to enlarge my shop right now.
 

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Sorry, I forgot to attach the table saw photo. Here it is...
You know, I hadn't noticed the TS integrated into your bench like that. Your setup goes a LONG way to proving folks that seem to swear woodworking can only be done on a $2K cabinet saw quite wrong. For the rest of us with affordable shops, thanks... Now get that thing dirty!
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Thanks, DBHost. I wasn't sure the TS tucked into the wall would work when I designed it, but it's fine for ripping & I built a cross-cut sled for short wide pieces (up to 16") that makes it a very stable setup. It's a cheap contsruction saw with a good blade & does the trick. Go figure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
BTW, the utility blade I use for my TS is a full kerf Freud 50T combination blade ($69). I've found that thin kerf blades, although recommended for under horse-powered saws, tend to vibrate too much & don't always produce a square cut. A quality full kerf blade with sharp teeth (always make a slower pass so the blade doesn't heat up & warp) has yet to fail me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
LOL, Sawduster. Seriously, I'm learning as I go & would some day like to get into making furniture. I'm a big fan of Sam Maloof. What do you make down there in Arizona? And what's this about kissing donkeys?:huh:
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I really should give credit where it's due for some of my space saving solutions. My sliding pegboard cabinet is a modification of a design I purchased from plansnow.com & you can find the clamp rack design in the Fine WoodWorking 2008 issue of "Workshop Solutions." There are also some great examples of rolling carts in this issue. For some nifty jig designs, check out Wood Magazine's 2008 issue of "Woodworking Jigs, Homemade Tools & Shop Organizers." I built my cross-cut sled from a design in this magazine. The rest is a little imagination and ingenuity, which all woodworkers possess.
 

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I can't find stock that nice to build my inside furniture out of, much less making storage for the garage shop.

The lumber at the big box is either 1) affordable and bent, dented, broken and warped, or 2) bent and expensive. The local lumber yards don't carry anything much besides yellow pine, and it's horribly cupped. A nice piece of oak or poplar is expensive as all get out here. I'm envious!
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Hey everyone, I'm still looking for your space-saving/storage pics... a unique way to store wood, wall & ceiling rigs, carts, tool storage, hardware bins, hidden compartments, James Bond devices, a box for your pet hamster who watches you work, anything... :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Hey, Justin. You don't need expensive wood to make nice stuff, although it's a plus if you can find hardwoods (or order them) from your local lumber dealer. My workbench is made from 2x3 rough pine, glued together and planed at a cost of under $100. If you can afford a few hardwoods (oak, maple, birch, walnut), even as accents (drawer facings, inlays, etc.), you can still keep your costs low. I understand that furniture making can be expensive, but there are alternatives. Plywood and veneer woods come to mind.
 

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Hi windstorm!

I'm exagerating a bit, but not much... the oak at the local places is really pricey and the yellow pine is in really bad shape, but I think the biggest problem is that they sell it to you with too high of a moisture content.

I'm a fairly brand new woodworker and I'm still gathering tools here and there. At some point I will want to make something out of a cherry or mahogany, but I'm not there yet skillwise, so my post was more of a rant than anything else.

I've made pantry shelving and some built-in bookcases from birch plywood and pine facing that turned out fine. My joinery and hand planing skills need to improve before I can make a table top or even think about buying the more expensive pieces of wood.

On the reclaimed note, however, I do have a table that I made out of lumber from a kids fort that was left in the backyard of my house when I bought it. It was treated wood, but had weathered something fierce! Once sawn and sanded, though, it was really stable and made a nice table that I painted.

I've also built one table out of cedar, which turned out ok, but was more of a farmhouse dining table, so the top had intentional gaps.

I put pine floors in the house and still have about 100 square feet of that left, which has dried out nicely.

Sorry, didn't mean to hijack this thread, I was mostly surprised by the quality of the boards he used in his garage!!! Very nice!
 

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Not much to brag about here, BUT since you asked..



Basic clamp racks, 2x2s screwed to 2x4 cutoffs and then in turn screwed into the wall studs.



I post this pic with the suggestion that you build your workbench tall enough that you can store stuff under it well. And of course, peg board is a great way to store stuff.

My biggest problem when trying to solve small shop storage issues is kicking myself into thinking vertically instead of horizontally. We have 3 dimensions to work in, not just 2...
 
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