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So this weekend I was making picture frames for the dining room walls and I had to create one triangle. It took a geometry refresher and some creativity on the table saw to get the angles I needed. I need to cut two 20 degree miters and two 25 degree miters but my miter gauge would only let me do down to 50 degree cuts. I cut a 2x4 at 45 degrees and clamped it to the table saw miter gauge and then set the gauge at 25 degrees in order to cutting 20 because of 45-25=20. This worked but didn't feel very safe. Should I look for a miter gauge that allows me to cut shallower angles than 50 degrees? How are you all doing stuff like this?

Thanks,

David
 

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For many years, used a protractor to set angles in between the most common used miter angles. Recently added a TS crosscut sled similar to the Rockler model 33113 which has a built in arcing protractor scale. Don't use it often, but when needed it is very accurate! Also check out those on line videos that built their own style. Be safe.
 

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Thanks, I just looked at that sled and it also doesn't allow a miter of less than 50 degrees. Or am I missing something?

Dvaid
 

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where's my table saw?
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you did what we all do...

So this weekend I was making picture frames for the dining room walls and I had to create one triangle. It took a geometry refresher and some creativity on the table saw to get the angles I needed. I need to cut two 20 degree miters and two 25 degree miters but my miter gauge would only let me do down to 50 degree cuts. I cut a 2x4 at 45 degrees and clamped it to the table saw miter gauge and then set the gauge at 25 degrees in order to cutting 20 because of 45-25=20. This worked but didn't feel very safe. Should I look for a miter gauge that allows me to cut shallower angles than 50 degrees? How are you all doing stuff like this?

Thanks,

David
There ain't no such animal ...mitergauge. Depending on the width of the workpiece you can use a sliding miter saw or the table saw as you did.

This doesn't come up very often except on flag cases where the angles are 22.5 degrees. This topic devolved into a life of it's own here a while back:
http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/angles-setting-miter-saw-9644/

You can make your spacer block at any common angle, but I would add a vertical strip to the fence side for easier clamping.
 

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The problem with angles greater than 45 degrees is that you are approaching the point where it becomes ripping rather than cross cutting and things can get a little hairy with a miter saw so you want things fastened down.

It is sometimes possible to use 30 degree angles and make a butt joint when building a triangular shaped object.
 

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where's my table saw?
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there ain't no such animal...mitergauge

Get an Incra 1000SE miter gauge. Very well designed, and will give ya all ya want.
That's what I use.
Bill

OP's post states:
Should I look for a miter gauge that allows me to cut shallower angles than 50 degrees? How are you all doing stuff like this? Thanks, David

There is no such miter gauge that will cut angles much less than 45 degrees, some may get to 50 or so.

There problem is the setting on the mitergauge is NOT the angle of the cut on the wood, which is actually 90 degrees minus the setting:

http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2011/07/29/miter-angles-miter-saws/



All this is well documented here:

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f27/a...iter-saw-9644/

You can't use a standard miter gauge to cut a 22.5 degree angle or any angle less than 45 degrees as measured with a protractor, on a workpiece without a spacer block.
 
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When your miter gauge is on zero, the resulting cut is 90 degrees, not zero degrees. You can't directly read the numbers on most miter gauges and think they represent the degrees you wish to cut, They are either in addition to 90 or less than 90.

When you need a cut beyond the capacity of the miter gauge, you can use the compliment of the angle as you did. What you didn't do is set up a safe, accurate system. A table saw sled is handy because it doesn't limit your cross cut angles. It's the accessories, jigs and fixtures you make that allow you to safely and accurately make challenging cuts. You can't go buy a new gizmo every time you have a problem to solve, in most cases, they don't exist. Sounds like you can solve problems well, now you just need to take a little time and make a good jig.
 
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