Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all - relatively new to woodworking and don't have a huge amount of tools or experience etc.

I have the idea to make a shoe rack from the cheapest thing I could find locally (9mm plywood). I would have liked thicker, but price was putting me off.

I am planning to just slot the plywood together. But haven't had any experience of doing that and cant find much at all on the forum or internet - maybe becasue it's so simple , no one bothers to write it up?

Do I literally cut the slots at 9mm? I don't have a router or table saw , so would I just see what my circular saw blade removes and work around that?
I plan on 3 'legs' / cross section pieces and 3 shelves, so would it stand and support itself or do I need to do something else ?

Any tips appreciated.
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,273 Posts
Hi all - relatively new to woodworking and don't have a huge amount of tools or experience etc.

I have the idea to make a shoe rack from the cheapest thing I could find locally (9mm plywood). I would have liked thicker, but price was putting me off.

I am planning to just slot the plywood together. But haven't had any experience of doing that and cant find much at all on the forum or internet - maybe becasue it's so simple , no one bothers to write it up?

Do I literally cut the slots at 9mm? I don't have a router or table saw , so would I just see what my circular saw blade removes and work around that?
I plan on 3 'legs' / cross section pieces and 3 shelves, so would it stand and support itself or do I need to do something else ?

Any tips appreciated.
Yes, a sketch of your idea would be helpful.
In general, slotting is a "cross" between using biscuits and splines.
The biscuit makes a half oval slot, the table saw makes a continuous groove or kerf either down the length or across the board.
You need to use biscuits specially made for that dimension of slot.
Splines are typically made in the shop to suit those dimensions.

If you want to butt join two layers of plywood together, a spline will indeed add strength.
If you want to join two wood pieces at right angles, a biscuit will help with alignment, and add some strength, BUT not as much as a mortise and tenon.
Pocket screws have taken over many types of joints because of their ease of installation.
 

·
The Nut in the Cellar
Joined
·
1,776 Posts
"Slotting" First image that popped into my head was some sort of egg crate arrangement. It's an image that I thought the term in the UK would refer to, but I'll wait on an image of the project.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LumberJoe

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,061 Posts
We can wait for his answer, but I have a feeling that the slot is similar to the picture. Look at the INSTRUCTABLES link. 9mm or ⅜" plywood is a little thin for shelves, just keep the span under 30cm or 12" and you should be fine
The slots can be cut most of the way with a circular saw and finished with a jig saw or hand saw.

Slot Joint Adjustable Bookshelves

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Morning!
Thanks for those pics @ogre, that is pretty much the idea I was planning. That is very helpful
It will only be holding a a few pairs of shoes by the back door, and I would love to have used thicker plywood , but it put the price of the overall project up by almost 1/3 to move up to 12mm.

I think my use of language was a little imprecise in my first post. So I see why you gave me that info @woodnthings - my lack correct grip on words for things in woodworking terms.

So , here below is the drawing I was going to post to try to explain what my words were failing to do. And as you can see, I am no technical drawer either haha 😂
There will be 3 'legs' or verticals and 3 horizontals

Thanks for help all!

Handwriting Azure Rectangle Schematic Slope
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
9 mm is 3/8” … so it would work for a shoe rack if each cubby is only big enough for one pair of shoes. And as someone else pointed out, it needs at least a partial back for stability.
I had planned for it to be enough on the right side to fit 2 pairs of shoes in each cubby.(6 pairs in total) The left was going to be a place for misc things (of no great weight).
@Half Fast Eddie Do you think 9mm would bow with 2 pairs per cubby ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
9mm (0.354331) is a little bit less than 3/8" so don't cut 3/8" wide slots. If the plywood was a bit thicker (12mm or better) I'd say your layout was OK, but to better support the thin unsupported halves I'd flip the middle vertical board slots back to front. If you are skilled with your circular saw lay out (draw) the slots carefully, extend the blade as far as it will go, then use it to cut both sides of each slot stopping the cut at the middle of each board. Then use a chisel or jig saw or both to clean out the center/ends. I'll OK 2 pairs per cubby if you flip the center board and no one is wearing the shoes when they are put on the shelf. ;) If your final half lap (aka halving) slots are a good snug fit you may not need a brace. If there is some slop in the slots then a back panel or some cross bracing will be needed. If you plan to move it frequently maybe extend the center vertical board and cut a hand hold slot in it. Maybe extend the left and right verticals down to become the feet of the design.

I apologize if my suggestions are too much. I just retired from teaching furniture design to college kids.
4D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,061 Posts
been thinking about cutting the slots. if you have a router, cut a master upright and shelf and use a template bit to cut the others. if you go this route, keep the bearing lubricated



i wouldn't go more than 30cm or 12" between uprights. ogres have big feet, that would be one pair of shoes, unless you stack the shoes 😂
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
4D , no apologies necessary - in fact, that kind of detail is much welcome and very much needed. I am about at the level of college kids when it comes to this. I don't know all the terms, names or techniques and I lack experience.

I like the idea of the centre vertical board being the one with the hand slot. I was mulling the idea of the 2 outside vertical boards having hand holds, but have a decision to make now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
been thinking about cutting the slots. if you have a router, cut a master upright and shelf and use a template bit to cut the others. if you go this route, keep the bearing lubricated



i wouldn't go more than 30cm or 12" between uprights. ogres have big feet, that would be one pair of shoes, unless you stack the shoes 😂
I don't have one, but have been looking at a hand held one from Ryobi as i already have the batteries, and it's relatively cheap.
I have planned for 15cm /6" between the uprights, which might be a touch small, but having measured my bigger shoes, it should just about work.
In the event of me getting a router in the near future, what do you lubricate the bearing with so as not to stain the wood?
Thanks for help
 

·
The Nut in the Cellar
Joined
·
1,776 Posts
If you have a circular saw, you could use a speed square to guide the initial cuts and then finish with a hand saw and chisel to square the ends of the slots. I lubricate router bit bearings with a drop of 3in1 oil that contains PTFE additive. No issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If you have a circular saw, you could use a speed square to guide the initial cuts and then finish with a hand saw and chisel to square the ends of the slots. I lubricate router bit bearings with a drop of 3in1 oil that contains PTFE additive. No issues.
Cheers Jim.
If I can find that router on a Black Friday deal at the moment then I'll grab it , if not I will be using circular saw later this week, of the weather is ok, as I have no workshop.
Regards
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top