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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well Im finally getting around to make a new table for the dining room. The wife and I desided to go with the farm table style, trestle will be next haha. I went out back and pulled some select boards out of one of the wood sheds, these boards came from a 36 ft axe cut sinker cypress. Hope it turns out great, any suggestions or ideas will be appreciated. You guys enjoy.
 

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Do you have a drawing of the table you are making? Maybe a picture that has inspired you?

What size will it finish out to be?

Looking good,

Dale in Indy
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Do you have a drawing of the table you are making? Maybe a picture that has inspired you?

What size will it finish out to be?

Looking good,

Dale in Indy
Yes, the size is going to be 84" by 46" with the height being 30", Sorry I don't have it drawn up at this time, but I'll try to get around to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I finished planing the boards down to the exact thickness and finally got them all jointed. One of the boards on the end has a slight bow so I'm going to see if I can get that pulled out over night.
 

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I'm viewing on my iPhone app & sometimes pics don't look as good as they should on mobile so I could be mistaken, but it looks as if there is a good bit of moisture coming out of your boards once they were planed. Have you checked your MC? Or is it grain variation causing the darker spots in some boards?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm viewing on my iPhone app & sometimes pics don't look as good as they should on mobile so I could be mistaken, but it looks as if there is a good bit of moisture coming out of your boards once they were planed. Have you checked your MC? Or is it grain variation causing the darker spots in some boards?
It is the different color variation in the grains. You can find all kinds of colors in this sinker wood, black ,green ,red ,orange, it can be very beautiful. These boards here are right at 9%
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
is that the natural color of cypress or is that due to being under water?
No it is not the natural color, the color is from being underwater for over a hundred years as minerals from the water soak into the wood causing these colors you see, and it is also old growth. Regular cypress you see today is a light colored wood. There is a lot of write ups on sinker cypress that is very interesting with lots of history.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yesterday evening after work I got started on putting the top together.
I decided to biscuit joint the boards together, put one every foot and glued and clamped it all together. I ran into a small problem, I have two boards that are sitting higher than the others about a 16th and I can't pull them down with the clamps, I hoping that it shouldn't be a problem to sand them down flat. Have any of you ran into this problem and does a little of sanding do the trick. Im sure a hand planer would work but I don't have one. :help:
 

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You could hand plane but if your inexperience it wouldn't work all that well. What I would try is find someone with a wide belt or drum sander in your area and ask if they could do it for you ( think cabinet shop ). Maybe you could also try ripping it apart at that joint and try it again.

Making flat panels isn't the easiest thing to do right but there are a few work arounds. Don't do the whole glue up at once maybe do several smaller ones then glue the smaller ones together. On a 24 inch wide panel i'll leave the boards a little thicker and then glue up 2 12 inch wide panels and then plane them to final thickness then i only have one glue joint to worry about in the final thickness. Making sure the edges are a perfect 90 degrees is the first part you should be able to have a perfect joint with no clamp pressure.
 
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