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Discussion Starter #1
For some reason this is something that has daunted me for years. I always manage it, but with great difficulty.:furious:

Say I want to join two pieces of wood at a right angle - nothing fancy, no dovetail, no lap joint, just a common edge to face joint.

What is the simplest way to do this and ensuring that the joint is a perfect 90 angle in two directions.
 

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Old School
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For some reason this is something that has daunted me for years. I always manage it, but with great difficulty.:furious:

Say I want to join two pieces of wood at a right angle - nothing fancy, no dovetail, no lap joint, just a common edge to face joint.

What is the simplest way to do this and ensuring that the joint is a perfect 90 angle in two directions.
If I understand your question, it sounds like a simple 45 degree miter on both pieces so when they fit the angle is a 90. Getting it right may depend on what you are using to cut the pieces.








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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Nope, don't need a mitre joint. I am trying to do a run of the mill edge to face joint.

http://books.google.com/books?id=kP...ook_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CBwQ6AEwAQ#
That isn't a bad example if you're having trouble picturing it - minus the helpers the book shows

I'm guessing the solution starts with using the bench vise - sad to say i don't actually have one of those. Perhaps the reason why this is such a challenge for me.
 

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John
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Nope, don't need a mitre joint. I am trying to do a run of the mill edge to face joint.

http://books.google.com/books?id=kP...ook_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CBwQ6AEwAQ#
That isn't a bad example if you're having trouble picturing it - minus the helpers the book shows

I'm guessing the solution starts with using the bench vise - sad to say i don't actually have one of those. Perhaps the reason why this is such a challenge for me.
Your link sent me to knock down fasteners but I don't read that in your question. Simplest edge to face joint that pretty much ensures a 90 degree joint is the rabbet. :huh:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, looks like I got my answer in a manner of speaking.
 

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Old School
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You could use a rabbet, but you would still have to use either a form on the inside of the sections to insure that the assembly if glued dries in a 90 degree angle. Pieces in a rabbet can be rocked out of 90 degree unless supported.

You could dado for a spline, which would lock both pieces to alignment, and further support as described above.








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Woodworker from Sacto
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Butt Joints

What you want to make is a Butt joint. It is simply an edge grain to long grain connection at a 90 degree angle.

The issue is that this is a very weak joint and must be reinforced mechanically. You can use dowels, biscuits, mortise and tenon or a fancy joint like a bridle joint or a half lap joint.

Simplist thing to use are called pocket screws. Go to Amazon and look for the Kreg jig for pocket screws. It's cheap and easy to do. Best of all, the pocket screws will pull the joint tight and square it up.

Have fun!
 

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What you want to make is a Butt joint. It is simply an edge grain to long grain connection at a 90 degree angle.

The issue is that this is a very weak joint and must be reinforced mechanically. You can use dowels, biscuits, mortise and tenon or a fancy joint like a bridle joint or a half lap joint.

Simplist thing to use are called pocket screws. Go to Amazon and look for the Kreg jig for pocket screws. It's cheap and easy to do. Best of all, the pocket screws will pull the joint tight and square it up.


+ 1 on the pocket screws
 

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Old School
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+ 1 on the pocket screws
I wouldn't knock pocket screws if you had to use them. I wouldn't use them. Learning how to do joinery in lieu of them may benefit you in the future. Besides the hassle of the set up and drilling, there are problems you may have. Pocket screws don't pull in a straight direction.

A rabbet joint and clamps will insure a good glue joint. An alignment can be achieved with using a spline which can position the pieces exactly for an ordinary butt joint. That joinery is by far, IMO, more predictable than using pocket screws. But, if you just have to find out, spend the money for the jig and the screws.








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+1 on pocket screws, I use a corner clamp and the pocket screw clamp that comes with the master kit. (hahaha master <insert face palm>) I also use glue on the mating edge.

I only use them on face frames though. Anything that is going to be for structure, support weight or in motion gets some kind of joinery. Daddo, rabbit, lock joint, doweling, etc.
 

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Old Methane Gas Cloud
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There are a couple of methods. First use any of those square joint products. They are nothing more than a piece that is made at a right angle and is clamped to the two pieces to hold them in the right angle position while the glue cures.

An alternate method is to use a piece of 2" right angle aluminum. Just clamp the aluminum to the two pieces.

BTW - Light clamping pressure across the joint is a big help to make a secure joint.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Rich, that sounds like a decent solution - get myself a good solid right angle bracket and use it as a reference angle and clamp surface.:thumbsup:
 
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