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Discussion Starter #1
Simple chair repair. The backs on our old Kmart chars are getting loose. Would it work for me to drive some kind of wedge into the bottom of the stick, or . . . ? See pic.
 

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where's my table saw?
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That would be a partial "fix".....

The best way to secure the loose joints is to remove the legs and backs and sand or scrape out the old glue and reassemble them with epoxy and small wedges.



I did something similar to these Murphy chairs:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f9/what-chairs-these-39917/





I used this glue because it's "gap filling" ....?
 
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I dread working on furniture people give me to repair after using Gorilla glue in their attempt to fix it.
In a lot of cases of loose joints this works very well where you can't get it completely apart.

https://www.amazon.com/Starbond-Cyanoacrylate-Microtips-Woodturning-Stabilizing/dp/B00C32ME6G
The photo of the "Gorilla" glue above is their somewhat new wood glue. It is a non-foaming, water-resistant PVA glue. I have not used it, but the specs read somewhat like Titebond II. (I prefer Titebond III.)

The original Gorilla Glue is a polyurethane glue, and is probably the one that you dread.
 

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I dread working on furniture people give me to repair after using Gorilla glue in their attempt to fix it.
In a lot of cases of loose joints this works very well where you can't get it completely apart.

https://www.amazon.com/Starbond-Cya...7&s=gateway&sprefix=wood+super,aps,162&sr=8-9
I don't. I just charge what it will take to repair it properly. Most often, taking time and care, it can take an hour just to un-do his handy work. Almost invariably, the cost of repair is way beyond what the piece is worth and so I wont have to deal with it.

If it just happens to be a nice piece, the customer will pay and with a look that goes without saying. Fortunately, that rolled back eyeball look was meant for the hubby and not me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Follow-up:

I removed the pocket screw, drilled the hole larger and glued a dowel in its place.

I did this on both the left and the right, and so far it's a tight hold.



The next step is to sand and repaint the whole set.
 

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By the way, do you know that the Gorilla Wood Glue you pictured in the photo is not "gap filling"? Gorilla Wood Glue is an ordinary PVA wood glue, like Titebond II. Wood glue is designed for tight fitting wood to wood joints between well-sanded, smooth, clean pieces of wood. PVA glues are arguably the best for woodworking joinery. Certainly they are the most economical and popular.

Someone else mentioned "Gorilla glue", meaning Gorilla brand's original polyurethane glue, which foams and is somewhat gap filling. It is moisture activated.

The best gap filling adhesive is two-part epoxy.
 

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it appears that it was intended for a wedge and an extra support screw from the side. when repairing, i always try to assess the amount of repair needed. e.g. if that is the only thing loose on the back, i may not remove the entire back for the repair. but if the back is all loose, i take it all apart.

as mentioned, some sanding in the holes and on the tenons, re-glue and re wedge fixes the looseness 99% of the time. i use titebond ii, but i know others like epoxy here.
 
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