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Came across this today...people are saying the Apple HomePod (a wireless speaker) leaves marks on furniture. Apple says the marks can be "caused by oils diffusing between the silicone base and the table surface, and will often go away after several days when the speaker is removed from the wooden surface."

What do you finishing experts think? Just another case of outrage over nothing? Or is there something wrong with the silicone rubber in the devices?

https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/a...mepod-vs-echo-vs-google-home-max-vs-sonos-one

 

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I think I would have to see a Homepod before really making a comment. Sometimes different products interact badly with each other and I'm wondering why anyone would want to use any electronic device on a oiled cutting board anyway.

Another possibility is speakers create a certain amount of vibration and if it's moving it's rubbing the surface which can make a mark.
 

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Tables do not necessarily have oiled surfaces.
Not all tables have identical finishes and moisture content.

I'll bet the formulation of the silicone is at fault and the company has 101 excuses to slough off consumer complaints.
I'd be some annoyed.
 

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The Nut in the Cellar
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Some years ago, we had custom glass table tops made for our new living room furniture. The glass shop provided polycarbonate disks to place under the glass and said they would not react with the finish. After about 10 years there were faint circles in the finish (some sort of Chinese lacquer). They didn't stick to the finish, and it was easy to buff out. I have seen the articles about the HomePod marking various wood tops (not just the butcher block). I believe the makeup of the silicone rings is indeed reacting with the various finishes. I'd bet most of them are factory lacquer finishes, but no one has specified what. I'm more interested in Apple's various responses that I've seen. 1. Clean it with the furniture manufacturer's recommendations. 2. The marks will go away after while if you take the HomePod off of the surface. (not holding my breath). 3 Don't put the HomePod on a wood surface.
 
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I’ve read many articles about the cushioning foam on guitar stands reacting with nitrocellulose lacquer. Some guitar stand makers even specify that their stands should not be used with guitars that have nitrocellulose lacquer finish.
 

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David
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I’ve read many articles about the cushioning foam on guitar stands reacting with nitrocellulose lacquer. Some guitar stand makers even specify that their stands should not be used with guitars that have nitrocellulose lacquer finish.
My wife made some felt sleeves to go over the foam cushions on the stand I use at church. The stand literature stated it won't hurt the finish but I didn't want to take any chances. After using it for about 4-5 years I don't see any marks on my guitar so it must have worked. Of course, it's only on there for a few hours every Sunday morning and sometimes for a couple of hours Sunday evening. It's rarely on there for practice because I'm always holding the guitar.

David
 

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The Nut in the Cellar
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Apparently, you can buy HomePod leather coasters online for $20.
 

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I’ve read many articles about the cushioning foam on guitar stands reacting with nitrocellulose lacquer. Some guitar stand makers even specify that their stands should not be used with guitars that have nitrocellulose lacquer finish.
That's pretty freakin' dumb because the most popular finish for hand-made acoustic guitars is... nitrocellulose lacquer!

Stand maker should remove his head from his hind end and maybe purchase a clue!

<Chas>
 

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Came across this today...people are saying the Apple HomePod (a wireless speaker) leaves marks on furniture. Apple says the marks can be "caused by oils diffusing between the silicone base and the table surface, and will often go away after several days when the speaker is removed from the wooden surface."

What do you finishing experts think? Just another case of outrage over nothing? Or is there something wrong with the silicone rubber in the devices?

Apple HomePod Review: It Only Sounds Great

So, does anyone know the best way to remove these marks? Does wet sanding work?
 

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Try wiping the spot with naphtha. It may be just something deposited on the surface. Naphtha is the main ingredient and wax and grease removers and may remove it. If you start sanding on a finish you would have to do the entire surface and then rub it out to a high gloss. Trying to rub a finish to a satin finish is very difficult because it tends to leave streaks in the sheen.
 

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Try wiping the spot with naphtha. It may be just something deposited on the surface. Naphtha is the main ingredient and wax and grease removers and may remove it. If you start sanding on a finish you would have to do the entire surface and then rub it out to a high gloss. Trying to rub a finish to a satin finish is very difficult because it tends to leave streaks in the sheen.
It's not on the surface, unfortunately. It looks like some kind of reaction with the finish.
 

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It’s caused by plasticizer migration. It’s probably completely through the film and there’s no way to remove it. Had it happen to my floors pictured due to leaving a portable air compressor with butyl rubber feet for a few days.

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I’ve also had it happen with space balls used to space framed raised panels, with pipe clamp protectors, and with masking tape containing maleic anhydride. The oily residues are due to plasticizers migrating into the finish and/or wood.
 
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