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crosseyed & dyslexic
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Discussion Starter #1
So far I've had fairly good results using my table saw for tenon work, but it is tedious work making sure I'm dead nuts on.
I recently read an article on the virtues of using a shoulder plane to fine fit a tenon. This is appealing to me in several ways. One, I don't have to be so anal in my saw setup, thus speeding up that process and two finally a way to properly deal with a misaligned shoulder.
I have been looking at several planes, the medium Veritas and the Stanley. The Veritas has a 11/16 blade is that adequate for most tenons?
The Stanley plane is a take apart that turns into a chisel plane, is that worthy or gimmick? I don't mind spending the money if I spend it once.
I'd appreciate your thoughts on the subject.
Eric
 

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I've got the Stanley 92 and to be honest, I use it more for rabbets than for shoulders (I don't have a rabbet plane).

You can use it as a chisel plane, and every once in a while it is handy to do a little trimming with it that way. However, if you use it for very long as a chisel plane you better have some really thick callus on your hands or wrap a rag over it. It is very uncomfortable.

I've been happy with the Stanley and would buy it again (Amazon ~$70) if I somehow lost it.

It's nowhere near the quality of the Veritas, but for me it does the job.
 

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I have the large and small LN, and the medium Veritas shoulder planes. The small LN seems to get used the most, but maybe that's because I do a lot of stub tenons. I generally favor the shape of the LN over the Veritas, thye just seem a little more comfortable to me and my smallish hands. The LN planes also have the blade stick out from the side of the plane by a few thousandths, I think Veritas skipped doing that. That said, the Veritas is an excellent plane, and does a very nice job. If I only had one, I would want it to be the medium size, and the 11/16 is also handy if you clean out the bottom of a 3/4" dado. Rest assured, between to two, you cannot pick a loser. I've not handled the Stanley, no opinion on that one....but I did see a recent deal on Amazon where you got it for somewhere in the $60 range (I think) with some kind of rebate deal. OK, I had to go look, it's $77 with a $10 rebate.
 
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I have a Med Veritas and a large LN. Both are great planes. The Large is almost too big for my large hands. Nice for large work though. The med fits perfect. I would buy both again. I have a LN chisel plane but I would not use it myself for tenons. If I were to have to settle on just one- it would be the medium in either LN or Veritas. Worth the extra bucks.
 
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crosseyed & dyslexic
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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks fellas!

Alrighty then, the big dogs have spoken :thumbsup: Thanks for the insight, and your time. I will be ordering a Medium but what? a LN or Veritas
Hmmm. decisions decisions.
 

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Alrighty then, the big dogs have spoken :thumbsup: Thanks for the insight, and your time. I will be ordering a Medium but what? a LN or Veritas
Hmmm. decisions decisions.
You will not regret either- they are magnificent tools. I have an LN block plane also that is kind of my right hand....... I just traded some wood for a LN dovetail saw that is almost to pretty to use. I am glad it does not realize what a hard life it will have- I will use it!!!
 
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crosseyed & dyslexic
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Discussion Starter #11
Ok guys it was a tough call but I went with the Veritas medium with the PM-V11 blade for $11 more. Can't wait!
 

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That would have been my choice too. I've been using the large and small Record since I bought them new before there was a LN or LV. Those were the only new ones that I knew anything about then.

Being super sharp is probably more important on a shoulder plane than any other.
 

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Pretty easy to use a sharp chisel, you can pare the cheeks on small cabinet tenons with great control. Not so easy to register a plane, work across the grain and get fine, consistent results. Shoulder planes come in handy for other work. I use a 3 in one quite a bit, not for forming rabbets but for tweaking a fit. I wouldn't use a plane to fit small tenons.
 

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It ties back to the name of the plane, shoulder plane. They're designed to register against a flat cheek to true up the shoulder if the tenon.
 
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