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Jeff G
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189 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I'm in the planning process for a small (~10" x 6" x 4"tall) box and was thinking of going with a mitered, splined, and coved look (much like this box here http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f13/table-saw-cove-miter-spline-box-progress-24809/index2...which is beautiful btw). I'm pretty sure that Bri did the coving fist, then mitered and splined, but I was thinking of reordered that and doing the mitering and splining first and THEN doing the cove cuts on each side of the box. The idea is that this would make the splines look curved and also make cleaning up the splines a lot easier.

My question is, is this safe? my shortest side will be only 6" long and I would normally be a bit timid when running that through my TS. However, in this case, I'll be running against an angled fence with push pads on top of the box (and maybe even some scrap wood behind the box) the whole way through. I'll also be taking tiny passes (1/16" at a time).

Do you think this is a high kick back cut? Note: I have an old Walker Turner TS with no riving knife (just a spliter...but that won't be useful b/c I'll be angling the blade).

Thanks!
 

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where's my table saw?
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28,745 Posts
I would hesitate to say either way

6" of length is not much support to maintain the piece perfectly flat and vertical.

If you really want to do it this way, I would suggest a "fool proof" jig, where it captures the piece, holds it vertical and is well supported.
Specialty jigs are what sets the advanced woodworker apart from the rest. It is worth the trouble to make the jig even though it may only be used for the one project. I had to make a curved rabbet on the edge of a box lid for the sides:

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/keepsake-box-step-step-13808/#post107389

 

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Registered
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291 Posts
That box is basically 4 bracket feet glued up. My usual bracket foot cove is long enough for 6 pieces and I cove them as a single 40-50" piece. Since I've not done what you want to do, I'll keep looking here to see how it comes out.

Forgot to mention, it's tricky to recreate the same exact profile on multiple pieces.
 

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Old School
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24,017 Posts
It looks like the box you referenced had some flat (that got eased later) on the edges to maintain itself through the cut. If your fence is set up correctly, and your feed rate is steady and against the fence, you should have no problems. But, when starting, if you feel at risk at all we will revert to a plan "B".






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Jeff G
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189 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone for the tips. I wound up making a one-off jig that holds the box pretty tightly. The jig took all of 5 minutes to build out of some scrap 3/4" ply strips I had laying around. Basically, I just shoved each side into the jig. There was just enough resistance to keep the box in place, but not enough to make putting it in too tough.

For the record, without some kind of jig, there is NO way I would have felt comfortable putting the short side of the box through the TS blade.

Images below and higher res here: http://imgur.com/a/AhxLX
 

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