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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This could just as easy go in the "hand tool" section, but it is a woodworking project too. I have a few old wood hand planes, and pick up a few every once in awhile. I have always threatened to make some repros from some of them that are shot, well I started with an easy one and made it out of curly maple and walnut.
I did not take a bunch of pictures. I am having camera troubles (bad flash) and the sun has refused to shine for several days, overcast and dreary.
I did cheat (hey it's my first one) I did not cut a square tapered hole for the blade/wedge like I had originally planned. I cut a slot and put a walnut accent on to make it solid. I have several more I am going to make. I will post them in this thread.
 

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planes

Daren I made some block planes a few years ago and I could never get the right angle on the irons so they chattered when used. Any ideas?


Gary
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Daren I made some block planes a few years ago and I could never get the right angle on the irons so they chattered when used. Any ideas?


Gary
Sounds like they were set too deep, protruded too much (and maybe not sharp enough). I have seen just about every angle there is from almost laying down to almost straight up. The depth of the cut and edge grind are the most finicky parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Not really a full wooden plane, but one I fixed. I found this old Stanley Bailey 28, the wood was shot. It looked like it had sat in a bucket of used motor oil. Which it turns out kept the metal like new :thumbsup:. I made a cherry/walnut body and cherry grips. It works very well and doesn't look too bad either I don't think.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Last one for awhile (nobody seems at all interested :laughing:) An experimental, it works pretty good. But I will admit I am making them more for fun and decoration.
 

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Great work Darren. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Another one. A bullnose scraper for cleaning glue lines or whatever, small stuff. I made the iron from a piece of old saw blade, it is sharp and cuts good. Simple little thing, but I needed something like this so I made it.
 

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Great looking plane Darren. Any more in the pipeline? :thumbsup:
 

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Another one. A bullnose scraper for cleaning glue lines or whatever, small stuff. I made the iron from a piece of old saw blade, it is sharp and cuts good. Simple little thing, but I needed something like this so I made it.
Daren!

Just yesterday I came across an old defunct 10" table saw blade... I had thrown in the trash...

Last night I dreamt of possibly using the metal in that blade for other things... lil knives, etc.

It's about 1/8" thick... at least there used to be carbide tips that were 1/8" :) :)

Today, I see your post and I read it AGAIN!!

I gotta ask you... Is this ole blade usefull for some of that there stuff?
Plane blades... I have an old plane without a blade... could I make one?
Carving knives... worth trying?

If so, how do you cut them up? With an ole fashioned hacksaw?!

Thank you...
 

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Last one for awhile (nobody seems at all interested :laughing:) An experimental, it works pretty good. But I will admit I am making them more for fun and decoration.
Those are mighty purdy!! I know a guy who would put those into his collection.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Just yesterday I came across an old defunct 10" table saw blade... I had thrown in the trash...

I gotta ask you... Is this ole blade usefull for some of that there stuff?
Plane blades... I have an old plane without a blade... could I make one?
Carving knives... worth trying?

If so, how do you cut them up? With an ole fashioned hacksaw?!

Thank you...
The steel on the body of a sawblade may be too soft to hold an edge (especially a carbide one) Having said that it can be tempered. The tips of even old all steel circular saw blades were usually tempered.

I used an already hard piece of steel, an old sawzall blade in the last plane.

I saw one time on some guys site, can't remember it now, he would take soft steel and use a tiny drill bit and hacksaw to cut his plane irons. A guy can drill a series of holes along his cut line on the drill press and lessen the amount of work with the hacksaw. I have a welding shop and sharpening shop so I have tools for cutting steel, but it looked like the drill and saw worked.

Ok tempering steel. I am no blacksmith ;), but this works for me. If you have a piece of softer steel you can heat it red hot with a torch, then quench it in water (or motor oil, I do that...but there are reasons why I am not suggesting anyone else does it. Stinks, fire hazard...) The rapid cooling makes the steel contract and harden, but makes it brittle. Step 2 clean the steel shiny again. Then reheat it until it starts to turn blue (but not glow, just blueing). Then set that piece of steel on something like an anvil/iron vise, that works as a heat sink and will draw the heat out of the steel. Presto, you have hardened steel that should be usable for a cutting tool. You just have to grind/sharpen it without getting it red hot again.
 

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The steel on the body of a sawblade may be too soft to hold an edge (especially a carbide one) Having said that it can be tempered. The tips of even old all steel circular saw blades were usually tempered.

I used an already hard piece of steel, an old sawzall blade in the last plane.

I saw one time on some guys site, can't remember it now, he would take soft steel and use a tiny drill bit and hacksaw to cut his plane irons. A guy can drill a series of holes along his cut line on the drill press and lessen the amount of work with the hacksaw. I have a welding shop and sharpening shop so I have tools for cutting steel, but it looked like the drill and saw worked.

Ok tempering steel. I am no blacksmith ;), but this works for me. If you have a piece of softer steel you can heat it red hot with a torch, then quench it in water (or motor oil, I do that...but there are reasons why I am not suggesting anyone else does it. Stinks, fire hazard...) The rapid cooling makes the steel contract and harden, but makes it brittle. Step 2 clean the steel shiny again. Then reheat it until it starts to turn blue (but not glow, just blueing). Then set that piece of steel on something like an anvil/iron vise, that works as a heat sink and will draw the heat out of the steel. Presto, you have hardened steel that should be usable for a cutting tool. You just have to grind/sharpen it without getting it red hot again.

Daren, thank you very much! Doesn't sound too bad...

I guess, if I had some saw blades that were NOT carbide tipped, they would probably be hard enough as is?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Great looking plane Darren. Any more in the pipeline? :thumbsup:
I am thinking real hard on a router cutter (dado plane). It would have 2 blades. The first is hollow ground with just 2 sharp points that contact the wood and cleanly cut across the grain. The second iron cleans the material from the dado. Maybe for hand cutting inlays ? Clamp a straight edge on the piece being cut and run the plane along the straight edge. I will post it when/if I get it working right. It could be done with other tools, but I think a 2 in 1 would be a challenge for me.:smile:
 
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