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Discussion Starter #1
Slowly but surely, I'm getting around to setting my shop and making it more user friendly. Its a 11' x 24' basement deal. Im looking for input on this layout so I can add outlets and set up the dust collection.

I'd like to have an outfeed table for the table saw but think maybe a fold out one is the way to go, and I havent figured out what to do wth the portable planer that isn't shown.

So what do you guys think?

SHOP_Model.jpg

Thanks,
Pete
 

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My shop is 12x20, so close to yours in size. I found a paperback book on small shop design. Following it's advice, I made my miter saw bench extend most of the way along one long wall. My router table, planer, spindle sander and jointer are on roll around stands and fit underneath the miter saw bench wings. This has worked out great. I have a dust collection system and use a Rockler dust rite handle to attach to a dust port on each tool as needed. The RAS, band saw and miter saw are permanently attached.

Good luck..!!!!
 

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Your design looks good. I agree with sailorman, that making some tools portable with casters is a good idea.
Also, the same could be said for you work bench, make it so it also serves as the outfeed table for your T/S, by attaching castors to it, make two of them locking castors.
I have my B/S, Drum sander, and belt/disk sander and planer all on castors to move them when not in use. Frees up a lot of space one might need at times.
Hope this helps.
 

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Looks to me like your biggest hurdle would be getting the table saw to your dust collector. I'd put it where the drum sander is, perpendicular to the wall. My only suggestion.
 

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Shop layout

The big thing I would do is make your outfeed table for the tablesaw the same as your workbench. I have a 5'x14' outfeed table which doubles as my workbench. I do not have a workbench other than my outfeed table and it works great. I made it big because I was lucky enough to have the room, but when my shop was in a double car garage I did the same thing only smaller and it worked great. It looks like you will have trouble running anything very long through your wide belt sander without running into your radial arm saw.

Best of Luck,

Bandman
 

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^^ What bandman said. Make your workbench a rolling one, and the same height (or 1/16" - 1/8" lower) and use it as an outfeed table. What about wood storage for long boards? I should do something similar to this and do a layout to see if I can make mine any better. It's about the same size as yours. Maybe when I get my router table done I'll do some drawings. I spent a ton of time configuring the entire basement layout when I finished it, but other than the wood storage, I didn't spend much time thinking about tool layout.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The drum sander and bandsaw are both mobile. I dont want to use the work bench as an outfeed table because the cement slab is so uneven and i always have too much stuff on the bench anyway. For lumber storage i have that above the mitersaw and usually lean the sheet goods against the wall where the drum sander is.
 

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If you have moblie/rolling tools, can you take them over to a single DC point? How efficient. I doubt that you can work a band saw, drum sander, table saw and router, all at the same time.

There's a lot of other stuff in the large room that I call my workshop (freezer, storage etc).
I built a square island bench: miter saw, drill press, band saw and router. If I drag the bench and twist it a little, I can walk a 16' board into the basement and cut it up. Must be 30' to the basement door, in an open line.
 

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Over all it looks very nice and comfy work space. I would suggest combining the table saw and router table into a single work station. I have my saw and router in one unit and love it. A router top in the wing of the saw, for instance. As others have said make everything mobile. In a small/narrow shop it will be important to have mobility. A suggestions for your portable planer, you might consider building a flip top work station and combining your scroll saw with the planer; also make that station mobile with caster set up.
 

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One thing I've discovered recently, is that it's one thing to have your tools arranged so you can use them, it's another to have enough space to actually assemble something you're building. I recently built a large corner desk for my kid's room at college. About 6' x 7', 2 drawer units and shelves above. Even with having the plywood cut to rough size by the lumber yard, and stacking it out of the way, I still had to build things in stages, as I didn't have room for the whole desk set up. I did manage to do one dry fit, before moving on to finishing, but it would have been nice if my shop was twice the size it is (12 x 20). If my tools weren't on rolling bases, I would not have been able to assemble it.

Pics below tell the story. I've since upgraded to a RIDGID R4512 tablesaw, which takes up more space. You can see how some of the tools fit under the wings of the miter saw.
 

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Pain in the A$$
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Sweet desk. What did you use for wood? I'd love to build something like that.

Mark
 

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Thanks; it's birch plywood, edged with mahogany strips; drawer fronts are poplar. All stained with Old Masters cherry gel stain (smells awful) and sprayed with water based poly. Better pic of color below.
 

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One thing I've experienced is that my initial shop set up doesn't look anything like what I have now. The evolving workspace has seen at least 7 major reconfigurations in its' 12 year life span and each setup seemed to be perfect. The best advise I can give you is be flexible. My shop is bigger then yours, 24' X 24', but my ceiling height is limited to 7ft.

I was going to suggest workbench = outfeed table, but you ruled that out. I have rollers I use and stow away when not needed. But do consider a fold out table for your outfeed. You could also use it as a finishing/ assembly table.

Everybody has his or her specific needs and work method and tool acquisition list. I ask you and others with humility and maybe a lack of understanding, why do you have a table saw and miter saw. I have a descent ts and have no need for a miter saw although I wish I had one to move to particular work sites. A good table saw does everything a miter saw does (or am I missing something?). The miter saw wall could be used for other tools.

The most important item in any workshop (I think) is the workbench. I see you're planning an island workbench which I wish I could have. Make sure it's stable and secured and flat. I had a flat solid core door until I resurfaced my bench last year with bamboo flooring and a system. I have never made a dime on my workbench system but I take every opportunity to share it with folks because it works so well for me. It is especially suited for small work shops in that moveable tools can be permanently mounted onto their own plywood bases and secured on the bench in less then a minute. Simply check it out on this site at http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/versatile-small-shop-work-bench-unique-40361/
 

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plus one on bandman, mines 20 X 20 and the biggest obstacle by far has always been fitting things into and out of the table saw. try to make it in the middle of your shop, with as much room behind and in front as you can stand. keep in mind you will need room on both sides too if you're going to rip sheet goods, unless you want to have to cut off the other side of the sheet and then resaw. thats what I have to do because my miter saw station is too close to the left of my saw, and I have to make two passes a lot!
 

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plus one on bandman, mines 20 X 20 and the biggest obstacle by far has always been fitting things into and out of the table saw. try to make it in the middle of your shop, with as much room behind and in front as you can stand. keep in mind you will need room on both sides too if you're going to rip sheet goods, unless you want to have to cut off the other side of the sheet and then resaw. thats what I have to do because my miter saw station is too close to the left of my saw, and I have to make two passes a lot!
I agree...at the very least you should swing the table saw lengthwise in the shop. I find that bringing long large stock into the shop often heads to the table saw first and thus the table saw should be placed conveniently to handle the initial cuts.
 

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Slowly but surely, I'm getting around to setting my shop and making it more user friendly. Its a 11' x 24' basement deal. Im looking for input on this layout so I can add outlets and set up the dust collection.

I'd like to have an outfeed table for the table saw but think maybe a fold out one is the way to go, and I havent figured out what to do wth the portable planer that isn't shown.

So what do you guys think?

View attachment 64394

Thanks,
Pete
You may want to reconsider the placement of your mitre saw unless your drum sander or your scroll saw are low enough to not interfere with your mitre saw.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
plus one on bandman, mines 20 X 20 and the biggest obstacle by far has always been fitting things into and out of the table saw. try to make it in the middle of your shop, with as much room behind and in front as you can stand. keep in mind you will need room on both sides too if you're going to rip sheet goods, unless you want to have to cut off the other side of the sheet and then resaw. thats what I have to do because my miter saw station is too close to the left of my saw, and I have to make two passes a lot!

I've been struggling with deciding what the longest board i would need to rip. Not counting plywood, I think i've always cut boards down to 8' or less before i sent it through the table saw. So I would need about 16 to 17' total running room. Its pretty tight getting full sheets of plywood down the stairs and into the shop so i've always cut it up outside on a pair of sawhorses. I think I'm going to rotate the saw 180 and bring it closer to the miter station. That way I can cut wood to length (which is stored above the miter saw) and feed it right into the table saw. Dust collection should be easier with that setup also.

By any chance, does anyone have any experience painting a concrete floor, over old cutback?
 
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