Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I had a friend give me his shop fox w1704 with a burnt up motor, any one ever buy one? I wonder how much they are?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
996 Posts
I don't know anything about fixing motors, but it seems many people are able to fix there dead motors fairly cheaply with basic parts.

Do you know why it's dead?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
620 Posts
Reading the specs online it has a capacitor start induction motor. Start with the capacitor, and the centrifugal start switch. There are videos on YouTube that cover testing capacitors and start switches.

If it actually let the smoke out of the windings, which would be rare, you will need to either need to rewind the motor or buy another one.
 

·
Woodworking Wanderer
Joined
·
216 Posts
I'd open it up, take a photo of the label with my cell phone to help ID it's specs, and call a couple of local motor rebuilding places...they can rebuild yours or probably trade for rebuilt unit on the spot if they have one.

The label has info like make/HP/Frame size...that's what the shops will ask you.

I'm a shopsmitth guy, shop fox was started by the guy who left Shopsmith (technically Magna) to start that company. Supposed to be beefier version of the SS.

The motor rebuild might be pretty reasonable...it could be as easy as a bad starter capacitor.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,059 Posts
If you have a multimeter, it would be a big help in troubleshooting, but even without one you can do a few things:
  • The capacitor is the most likely part to fail. When you turn the motor on and you know for sure that power is getting to the motor, but it just hums and won't turn -- most likely the capacitor is bad.
  • A bad centrifugal switch can cause the same symptom as a bad capacitor. To check the switch you need to open the motor and examine the switch. Often it will be obvious if the switch is bad -- thingz like a broken spring or loose centrifugal weight are the most common problems with the switch. Another switch problem could be burned contacts.
  • A third reason for the motor humming, but not turning is an open start winding. If that is the problem then the motor is junk. A very long time ago, consumer grade motors were rewound, but it is no longer economically feasible. Only expensive industrial motors are still rewound.
  • For the three above cases, the motor can be started by giving the shaft a spin by hand to get it going -- first remove any drive belt before hand propping the motor. You should be able to start itgoing in either direction.
  • If no humming sound is coming from the motor, it may not be getting power. If you know that it is getting power then the most likely suspect is the thermal overload switch (or fuse). On some motors this is repairable and on others it is buried in the windings and essentially not repairable. If you see a reset button on the motor then you may be in luck. pushing it might reset the breaker or at worst, the thermal breaker might need to be replaced.
  • The worst case would be if the run windingis open. Again, rewinding is not normally an option.
  • With the drive belt removed and power off, turn the shaft by hand. It should spin freely and very easily and not make any noise (except fotpr the centrifugal switch. If it is hard to turn or drags or makes a clicking,ticking, scraping, or rumbling noise, the bearings are history. If you aren't an expert at replacing bearings, your motor is not the right place to become a self-taught expert. Take it to a shop and let them replace the bearings.
  • It is worth mentioning again that a motor won't run without electricity. If it seems completely dead, verify again that power is present at the motor.
  • One final test -- open the motor and if there is the unmistakable smell of ozone, then it is very likely that the motor has gone to the happy hunting ground.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top