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I am setting up a new shop. The dimensions are 28 by 32.
Any suggestions about floor plan - set up? Or sites where I might view shop floor plans?
Thanks!
 

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Your shop is almost exactly the same size as mine. I started out with a layout and ended up with almost everything but my lathes on mobile bases. My shop has turned into a large Rubic's Cube...move 6 to get 1 where you want it...:laughing: :laughing: :laughing:
 

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Grizzly website has a shop design tool that you can use. The also have scale models of their tools so you can locate items and see how they fit. They also have cabinet boxes and windows and doors so you can lay it out just like your gonna build your shop.
 

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One thing which has saved me an enormous amount of time is that I welded (through bolted would also work) 2 sets of steel "L"'s above my jointer and thickness plane, both of which are positioned next to walls.

I stack lumber on one set of L's, and then move each board (one at a time) to the other set after machining each. When one pass has been completed, all the stock that had been stacked on the lower set is now stacked on the upper set. The lower set is now empty to accept the stock from the upper set after the next pass.

Stacking material in any other manner other than the above will result in having to either lift the stock over your head to joint it (for instance) and then lift it back up over your head to set it back down again, or spin it end for end as you do a little pirouette off the side of your jointer.

Additionally, when both jointing and planing, you may want to keep track of which direction your board should be going through the machine. (Let's see - did I piroutte on that one or lift it over my head? Or what did my apprentice, Biaggio Pflopp, do before he disappeared again?)

For obvious reasons, brackets above a jointer must be super solid and not deflect even slightly. Lag bolts are NOT acceptable in this application and suitable steel should be used instead of wood. Angled legs back to the walls will not work (especially for the upper brackets) because they will interfere with stacking lumber on the lower ones.

I often size flush (or "inset" if you're out west) cabinet doors with the jointer - even the tops and bottoms. Therefore, I pull the jointer slightly off the wall so the taller doors don't hit the lumber. Too far off is not good for your back. The brackets need not be deep. 12 - 14" is more than enough.

And don't forget that you can always add a window here or there if perpendicular walls get in the way.

Just something you might want to think about.

Regards,
Jimc
 
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