Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Being a new member I will post the progress I have so far

Got on the kick of eating home grown food. Thought why not do it through the winter. So this is how I have been spending my afternoons after work. There is still plenty of work that needs to be done. I will have to make a gutter system on front, completely finish the interior, more ventilation for when windows are shut, rain water system, etc, etc. The list goes on. But its been a fun project. Look forward to seeing what all I can produce when its in the 30's.

Will do start to finish pics, with some descriptions if needed.

They are all cell phone pics, so some poor quality.

Initial chosen build site



Mock up plans



Let the work begin



Chipping away old concrete




Making front frame


Did have to get a buddy to come help me set front frame
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Working on getting it framed up


Glass door installation


More framing for other windows




Made a 6" wide slab 3-4" deep around bottom of frame. Hope to prevent critter intrusion




Getting windows up and ready


All the supplies for siding and trim work




 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
More siding





Here was the fun part. The windows I used were free. They didnt exactly work correctly with the trim I was using so had to do some router work



Making sure everything is up to par







 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Paint time, the worst time







First time I measured wrong on over hang, and decided to redo the front of supports. Didn't have any help so I had to be creative





For the life of me I could not find or purchase flashing that worked correctly with the corrugated panels. So I had to make my own





Time for the roof





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·












Well this is the current progress. Still have more trim work, paint work, then the complete inside. It has been enjoyable.

Sure this will bore some of the construction guys but I had fun.

Thanks for looking
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,391 Posts
Did I see things correctly? You erected the frame and then poured the cement? What are you using as a floor? If you have freezing winters, don't be surprised if you experience frost heave.

Otherwise it turned out real nice. Be sure to keep us updated, and supplied with fresh produce.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The concrete barrier was actually an after thought. At first was just going to use buried concrete board or something similar. Mainly to keep ***** and possum from digging under. We very rarely experience any days below 32 here, currently its 104.

The interior floor will just be several layers of gardening fabric, fill dirt then 1-2" of gravel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
That's a nice looking addition!

A comment on your plan for the floor. I wouldn't put fill dirt on top of the gardening fabric, when you water, it will turn to mud and the gravel will just sink into it making a mess. I'd just put the gravel on top of the fabric. You might also think of putting a thicker layer of gravel than just 1-2". I'd suggest more like 4" of pea gravel (or what ever you can obtain in your area).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the advice. One reason of joining a forum is new ideas. You make a really good point and honestly didn't think about that. I think I will do that.

I'm hoping no water ever touches the floor. I have an old sprinkler system controller and plan on making everything on a timer/ drip system. With the size of the pots and the slow drip hopefully the majority gets absorbed before making a mess.

The initial plan was all pea gravel but the quotes I got were more than in my price range. Fill dirt is free so that was the only remaining expense. I agree the more the better. Hopefully I will find something in my budget.

Thanks again guys for the comments and keep em coming
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,992 Posts
Did I see things correctly? You erected the frame and then poured the cement? What are you using as a floor? If you have freezing winters, don't be surprised if you experience frost heave.

Otherwise it turned out real nice. Be sure to keep us updated, and supplied with fresh produce.
No frost heave in East Texas.

George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,992 Posts
The concrete barrier was actually an after thought. At first was just going to use buried concrete board or something similar. Mainly to keep ***** and possum from digging under. We very rarely experience any days below 32 here, currently its 104.

The interior floor will just be several layers of gardening fabric, fill dirt then 1-2" of gravel.
Where do you live in East Texas. Unless this global warming has been more then I am aware I would think you have a lot of nights when it is well below 32 degrees. Not many days when it does not get above 32 degrees. I lived South of Houston for over 9 years and we had a lot of cold weather.

You will need to provide heat at night many nights in the winter and some days.

If you are very good at square foot gardening you should get a fair supply of many herbs and vegetables. At least it will be fun. I no longer try to grow anything during the winter but have an extensive summer garden.

Good luck.

George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks George, should be an interesting task. My summer garden did great aside of my zucchini and squash.

I plan on keeping the inside temps regulated with additional heaters and thermostats during winter nights and days. The nights will dip to or below 32, but quickly heats up during the day. Being that cold alternative heat sources will be necessary. I did it last year in my garage on a much smaller scale under lights, the heaters ran all night and shut off about mid morning. I am hoping with additional sun UV rays it will help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
Here's a tip for maintaining temps during the night without heaters. Use buckets filled with water tucked in corners, under benches, or where ever you have space. They will heat up during the day and are a great buffer on cold nights. I'd recommend using covers on the buckets or you will have way too much humidity and will wake up to dripping walls/ceiling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,783 Posts
The mass of damp soil from daytime heating should get through all but the worst of cold nights.
Forget the dirt on the floor, gravel only. You will learn that attempting to be really tidy,
watering in a greenhouse, is a waste of your valuable time.

In the summer, the heat will cook your plants, shade cloth or no shade cloth.
Gotta think about BIG fans. Can you score a used swamp cooler?
Ramblings from a retired botany professor.

I think the very greatest merit in a greenhouse in the winter is "head-space."
A place to go and sit, maybe read, green things around, on a bitter day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hey guys been a while but finally made some progress. The sides are pretty much pointless but for another 60-70 bucks I think it looks better





Now here is what I need from y'all! I need creative ways to maximize space.

I have already decided to cut circles in 3/4 ply and let the pots countersink in them. Plus bending the lattice so the veggies hang.

What else do y'all have that's creative. I need to finish inside by Nov. 1st

Mods now that it's not really wood working related I understand if you move it

Thanks guys!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
To utilize space think about more than just benches and hanging pots. I've seen stepped benches (think stadium seats) that go from the floor to the ceiling. You can literally have 5-6 rows of plants using up only about 4' in width.

A lot of organization will depend on the types/sizes of plants you are going to use. With plants on shelves, keep the high light plants on the top and let their foliage provide shade to low light plants.

Think trellis/string and other methods to train plant foliage vertically. I've seen commercial cucumber production where each plant/pot only uses 1 sq ft of bench space. The vine is trained and will climb nothing more than a string hanging from the ceiling. Same thing with tomatoes - they don't need to grow in a bush shape like in the garden, prune/train them to one "vine" and let it grow as long as it wants.

Those are kind of random thoughts, but you get the idea. Use all the space and think how you can grow vertically instead of horizontally.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top