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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys!
I am brand new to this forum and I could use some advice. I was at a garage sale not too long ago and I spotted a cool looking cane that grabbed my attention. I confirmed with the seller that it was a real shillelagh that he had bought on a trip to Ireland. He said that he was too lazy to fix it so he let me have it for $5! :thumbsup:

I not sure what method to use to bind the pieces together, what kind of epoxy, glue, etc...
I would like the strongest bond that I could get.

I also am going to need a filler that somewhat matches the color of the wood. It is made from blackthorn, a tree that I am not at all familiar with.
The wood itself is quite strong and has an interesting, "springy" quality to it. I could see how the fighting Irish could really wail on someone with one of these!:icon_smile:

Here are some pics:




 

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That is not an easy break to attempt a fix.

Titebond III is perhaps the strongest bond - in a good clean tight fitting joint. You do not have a good tight fitting joint.

Next would be a good epoxy like System 3.
http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2000342/2603/System-Three-5-Minute-Epoxy-12-Pint.aspx

A break like this is better reinforced with a dowel, but it is not going to be easy to line up the holes. You may need to drill e.g., 5/16in dia hole and epoxy in a 1/4in dowel to reinforce the joint.

If you have to use wood filler, I like the Timbermate brand. Available in pre-mixed or natural. Can be stained to match.
http://www.woodcraft.com/search2/search.aspx?query=timbermate wood filler
 

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It's hard to tell from the picture. If the break is new wood and hasn't been repaired before I would use a wood glue to glue it back together. Clamping it will be the hard part. I would practise with wood clamps without glue first to see how well you can clamp it before starting. Once you put glue on it then you are pretty much commited to glue it. If it has been repaired before I would try to dowel it and use a slow dry two part epoxy to glue it. If there isn't very much to fill I think I would be inclined to use a soft putty to fill it. That way you wouldn't end up having to modify the finish. The less you can do to it the better.
 

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PVA glue (Titebond) requires that all prior adhesive be completely remove from the joint that will be glued. Residual adhesive creates a very weak joint.

The best adhesive is a two part, slow set epoxy. Epoxy is gap filling and will bond surfaces that contain other adhesives. However, you may still have weak joint. I would probably drill through the joint and insert a dowel or two through it to provide additional strength. Between the epoxy and the dowels the joint would probably be strong enough.
 

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PVA glues (white), and yellow glues (aliphatic resin), would not be effective for this repair. I would join with a two part epoxy, and clamped with a handscrew. Once the glue has cured, I would drill completely through, and insert a large dowel, probably ½" or larger, and epoxy in. Then sand the ends to the shape to be flush.






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Following C-man's directions will result in a very strong repair. As for filler, I would collect the blackthorn shavings from the drilling. Put the shavings on a small plate and chop them up using a single edge razor blade. The object here is to end up with the finest dust you can produce. If you have access to a mortar and pestle you could further grind the shavings into dust. Then mix the dust with epoxy to the consistency of peanut butter and use it for filler. Don't put it on thick as it will cure very hard and be hard to sand to final shape.
 

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humble artizan
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Darkmoor will be making ss 304~head Irish sticks like that.. 500 are on order. Recommend you remove the head and mate to a suitable hardwood shaft. We do have some very tough hardwoods such as laurel, maple and honeylocust if you are interested

Blackthorn is an Irish shrub
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the reply's everyone! I am going to order the supplies and try to make a good strong repair. I was debating on whether or not to remove
the broken piece and sand it down, but I think repairing this is worth a try because of how unique it is.
 

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humble artizan
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What has any of that crap got to do with you advocating the destruction of a fine cultural item ?

If he starts using it for an orthopedic or defensive type type stick (the original intent of a blackthorn stick) it's gonna matter.

If it's just for show it won't matter

Thanks for all the fish
 

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If he starts using it for an orthopedic or defensive type type stick (the original intent of a blackthorn stick) it's gonna matter.

If it's just for show it won't matter

Thanks for all the fish
A solid repair , such as the one recommended by Cabinetman will satisfy all those and more.

The name comes from Shillelagh , nearby the Tomnafinogue Oak Forest , as do many of the oak bata , other bata are from Blackthorn /Sloe trees .


Laurel, maple and honeylocust are not in the running

a plastic Shillelagh indeed :laughing:
 

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Maker of sawdust
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lining up the two haves on the cane can be accomplished using the size bit of lets say 5/16th. After the hole is drilled use a centering pin that will put a mark on the apposing piece that will be true center not just guessing and hoping you will get it lined up.

Jerry
 
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