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I am just getting into turning. I have to sharpen my tools by hand , what
Is a good stone to use and any one have any video of by hand?
 

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It's not practical to shape and sharpen turning tools with bench stones, except to hone them between grindings. Especially with the HSS tools we use today. Do you have a disc sander or belt sander?
 

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where's my table saw?
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build a jig like this

 

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Yeah youll have to be a little more clear. By hand or free hand? If you have a grinder or a sander, you can build a simple jig to help you out. I dont even know where to begin with actually doing it by hand on a bench. That would take some serious skill!
 

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Here's my video on sharpening tips. Hopefully it will help. If you must sharpen totally by hand using a stone just about any stone will work. Well probably not the ultrafine white stones but any good oilstone.
If you have a disc sander or belt sander I can walk you through sharpening on that.
Most turners use a grinder, preferably with a white wheel instead of the old gray ones, however I did use the gray wheels for a while. If you do have a grinder i might have a wheel you can have.
 

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If you do have a grinder, theres something to be said about taking care of your wheels too. I built my current sharpening system a year or so ago. I used a WC slow speed grinder(I believe they replaced this model with a Rikon model now) and the Oneway Wolverine system. After a year of regular sharpening I noticed my wheels were starting to get a little dished shaped and it was affecting my grinds. I just recently got the wheel dressing jig from Oneway and man what a difference flat wheels make!

I knew when I got into turning that having sharp tools was important. I didnt realise how important untill I really got into it. When you can spring for it, I highly reccommend the complete Oneway system. Perfect grinds in seconds and they are the same everytime, even for a guy like me that is clueless when it comes to tool sharpening.
 

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I have a diamond stone. 400 grit. So free hand and by hand
That is fine for honing and touching up the edge several times between sharpenings on either a bench grinder,a belt sander, or a powered wet sharpening system. If you are willing to spend huge amounts of time with a fine grit diamond hand hone a really dull tool can be sharpened, but you will be happier in the long run with something better. With some curved edged tools it will be a bit of a challenge in maintaining the shape over the long term using only a hand hone, but on the other hand you can develop a lot of skill in hand sharpening as well as getting some good arm and hand exercise. ;)
 

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Could not agree with Bill more. Even a cheap grinder will do the job with a little tune up. I have a video on truing and balancing a grinding wheel which is half the problem with inexpensive grinders.
 

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I used a standard belt sander mounted sideways to sharpen gouges for a while. Be sure and take the cloth dust collector bag off. Mine now looks like swiss cheese.
I am now using a 1" strip sander to sharpen some tools. it works really great.
In the past I have used disc sanders. I mounted one to the handwheel so it was always ready. The next one I made had a hole in the back so I could mount it in my chuck any time I needed it. Of course that meant dismounting the work which wasn't the best of things.
 

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I maintain a dozen(?) Sorby lathe tools, just paying it forward for when I might want to turn something useful to my wood carving. All done freehand. This is a learned process and I have been doing it for decades.
1. The oilstone grit that I start with depends on my judgement of how banged up the edge is.
2. I have to measure the bevel angle. Then draw that on a "cue-card" which stands before me.
3. Tricks which are not in the books:
a) paint the bevel with black felt marker so I can inspect my work.
b) hold my forearms tight to my sides to prevent me from sweeping (up off the stone)
4. Seems to me that most turnings will have the surface shredded with sandpapers so taking the tool beyond 800 (3M W&D automotive paper on a granite slab) isn't worth the time.
5. I'll do better (1K, 4K and 30,000grit hone) if I need to.
= = =
I have 2 very ordinary hardware store, 2-grit oil stones. They look different, no grit sizes specified. So, I shut my eyes and used my fingertips, comparing with various grits of woodworking sandpapers. My best guess is that one stone is 80/120 and the other is 120/220.
 

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I am just getting into turning. I have to sharpen my tools by hand , what
Is a good stone to use and any one have any video of by hand?
If you want to sharpen your lathe tools by hand , get one of these



and that will keep tools like these sharp



for working on one of these



But if you drive something a bit like this



and use tools like these



you would be best served with something like this



The steel in todays lathe tools is far different to that of even 40 years ago . They were more akin to the carpenters chisels of the day .

As much Robson and his fellow carvers can sharpen an edge that will do a fine job , a modern lathe runs at speeds that will have a modern turning tool's edge slice thru more wood in a few minutes than a carving chisel's will in a days work .

Knowing how to get good results in both schools is the best option
 

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If you want to sharpen your lathe tools by hand , get one of these

and that will keep tools like these sharp

for working on one of these

But if you drive something a bit like this

and use tools like these

you would be best served with something like this

The steel in todays lathe tools is far different to that of even 40 years ago . They were more akin to the carpenters chisels of the day.

As much Robson and his fellow carvers can sharpen an edge that will do a fine job , a modern lathe runs at speeds that will have a modern turning tool's edge slice thru more wood in a few minutes than a carving chisel's will in a days work .

Knowing how to get good results in both schools is the best option
:thumbsup:
 
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