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When I'm sharpening a turning gouge or skew should the bevel be flat or concave? Does it make a difference?
 

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Flat. Some of the new wet wheel systems (Tormek for example) even say their product is better for sharpening because the wheel is bigger (10" instead of 6") which lessons some of the "hollow grind" or as you put it concave edge which is undesirable. I still don't like them, I have a flat surface grinder (and an antique 14" wheel).

I attached a couple shots of a thing that hangs in my sharpening shop...I really never look at, but it says "professional" at the top and gives people a good impression :laughing:. The most common angles are on the close up (hope you can read it, kinda bad picture)...having said that it is a preference thing. I have had to make some of my own lathe tools, as well as ground store bought ones to suit the task.

But the answer to your question is flat.
 

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johnep
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sharpening

That chart looks real good. Would be nice if available as, say a pdf.

The Tormek site does give a great deal of useful info.

johnep
 

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I just got a new computer a couple weeks ago and Vista is new to me, I am still having troubles figuring out some applications....like making a pdf :glare:.

I did throw the picture in a photobucket and it can be zoomed for a closer look. Hopefully the link works. Kind of a pain in the rear for you to look at, but that is all I got right now (stupid new computer/my inexperience with it :censored:) It is a big file it takes a second or 2 to load. The chart is just some basic info...there is alot more to sharpening in most cases, but this would be handy to have around the wood shop if a guy does some sharpening of his own tools. http://s149.photobucket.com/albums/s78/sawmilldaren/?action=view&current=100_1130.jpg

Here is another link about lathe tool sharpening some might find useful. http://www.woodturningwiz.com/sharpening-chisels.html
 

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Hi Tim
How to sharpen chisels is as contentious a topic as which way to hang the toilet roll in the bathroom. It is very largely a preference thing, but also is dependent on type of work you are doing, type of wood, hardness, etc. There is an excellent book available, which I purchased when I was starting to learn how to sharpen my various woodworking chisels. " The Compete Guide To Sharpening", by Leonard Lee. It is put out by the Taunton Press. I obtained my copy from Lee Valley Tools. www.leevalley.com.
I believe I paid about $22.00 CDN. I have found it really helpful, in not only knowing how to sharpen my tools, but also why I am sharpening the different tools in different ways.

Gerry
 

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Hi Tim
How to sharpen chisels is as contentious a topic as which way to hang the toilet roll in the bathroom.
Gerry
As a master plumber in a past life, that not only strikes me funny :laughing:, but rings true.

As far as a source for the sharpening chart, I am at a loss. It was published by The SKOG Company, Minneapolis Minnesota. I have some old "sharpeners reports" they used to publish too (current pricing info and stuff for sharpening shops) I don't think they are still in business, the last report I have is 1994 :huh:. That chart was just in with some stuff a guy I bought some tools from had, along with the reports and other literature.

I Googled SKOG Company, and sharpening reports several months ago and came up empty. The guy who taught me how to sharpen used to get all kinds of mailings from similar companies with tech stuff and business tips, but he said they just kinda one by one fizzled and stopped sending the info. I have my theories on why, the small time sharpening shops were dying off at the same time. Cheap import throw away tools took over the majority of the market, why have something sharpened when for a couple bucks more you can have new like carbide circular saw blades. Nobody had handsaws sharpened anymore either, drill bits... etc. The local lumber yards died off and everyone started going to the "big box" for building materials, where they bought their cheap imported tools too. That is just my rambling thoughts on that from what I have seen around here.
 

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Daren, you probably got all the Windows bundle when you got your computer didn't you? Because if not don't go spend the megabucks on it. OpenOffice is free and works great.

I haven't sent my box of dull stuff yet because I'm waiting to dull enough stuff to make it worth your while. It takes a long time to fill up a sea container with dull blades. :shifty:
 

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johnep
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sharpening

Gee thanks Daren, I have saved the photobucket file and will examine at leisure.

Just wonder how all these angles were arrived at.
johnep
 

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johnep
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sharpening

Have been working on the tool sharpening chart in an art prog.

Have been able to cut out the various sections and blow them upto A4
size. The section on knife sharpening is very useful.

thanks Daren.

johnep
 

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Hi Daren

I expect you are right on the money, with regard to the cheap import stuff. And, I confess I am a guilty party. If I couldn't buy the cheap import stuff I probably wouldn't have half of the stuff I do. As I am a dabbler, and I haven't settled down to any one thing, I can't really afford to buy top of the line, at this point. I admire those of you who have really seemed to find a "niche" . Good on you. I also do admit, that if I ever settle down to any one thing, I will probably be looking for the best tools I can buy. However, I am not too sure if I am ever going to grow up, so this may all be a moot point.

Keep on doin what yer doin til it fun no more. Then change.

Best Regards

Gerry
 
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