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Discussion Starter #1
What type of sharpening wheels do you guys use? I am looking to buy a new set of wheels and wanted to get everyone's opinion.

Thanks!!!
 

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How much you wanna spend? I use a $15 "fine" wheel that has served me well for 15 years. It needs to be dressed occaisionally. But the latest hi tech wheels are more that 10x that. I'll never own one but I hear they're nice.
 

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I have an 80 grit white wheel on the left side and a new 180 grit CBN wheel on the right. I love the CBN but they are very expensive. I used to use the 120 grit white wheel on the right. If I was going with regular grinding stones I'd go with the Norton's as well. They don't groove as bad as the white ones and don't need dressing quite as often. I have one and will replace my white wheel with it when it wears down. I'm hoping the CBN will last the rest of my life but probably not. They say you should get 5 years of very active use out of it so maybe I can get 10 which isn't bad if the divide the $200 cost by 10.
The CBN wheels run cooler and cut as fast or even faster. My 180 wheel cuts as fast as about 100 grit white wheel. It doesn't raise that cloud of hazerdous dust that the grinding wheels do. It comes and stays perfectly balanced. It is a dream to sharpen on especially if you hand sharpen vs jig, but is just as pleasurable with a jig. It never wears down and changes size like the stones do so you can lock the various jigs into position and don't have to change them which really saves tool life.
 

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The Norton 3X wheels are very long lived, well worth the premium cost.
 

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Wooduse said:
Thanks for the info guys. Is the 80grit the finest a norton wheel come in?
Not sure about finest but I love mine and use it for all my turning tools.
 

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Don't worry too much about the grit. I've had lots of discussions on sharpening this last year and the top professional turners use everything from 60 grit to 1000 grit. 60,80, and 100 being the most common. You get a very usable cutting edge from any one of those grits. I am currrently using 180 and 320 but I turn mostly dry woods that often have very squirly grain and hate to start sanding less than 220 if I can. I'm also just trying to learn what the advantages are of finer grits.
 

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Use an old cheap grinder and made a sanding disc for the lathe. A person could buy the most expensive fancy doodad there is but in the end (I personally believe) skill and knowledge will be what counts. I have even used a $20.00 belt sander from HF with no problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
My sharpening skills are not the problem. I'm using an old $50 grinder with some very worn out, possibly original, wheels. My tools have been sharp and leaving a clean surface hasn't been a problem. I just need new wheels.

Thanks John! You are always a big help. I'll get one ordered today from packard woodworks. Thanks again!
 

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My sharpening skills are not the problem. I'm using an old $50 grinder with some very worn out, possibly original, wheels. My tools have been sharp and leaving a clean surface hasn't been a problem. I just need new wheels.
I meant no ill with my post, sorry if you perceived it that way :oops: . I just see a lot of folks thinking the only way they'll get a decent edge is too buy the most expensive gadget out there.
 
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